Mango Descriptions

S - T

Sweet Tart

Sweet Tart was a seedling of Zill Indochinese (Zinc) selected from the breeding program of Gary Zill in Boynton Beach, FL. Its original planting number was C-1. 

The fruit are small, yellow at maturity, with an oval-oblong shape similar to ‘Glenn’. The flesh is medium-firm, fiberless, and orange in color, containing a polyembryonic seed with poor flesh-to-seed ratio. The flavor is nothing short of amazing, a flavor bomb with intense richness and complexity, its strong tart component like that of a candy that gets balanced out by a big punch of sweetness. As the fruit becomes more ripe, its tart component diminished as the sweetness becomes cola syrup-like. 

The trees are vigorous growers with somewhat vertical growth habit. They have very good anthracnose resistance both at the floral and fruiting stage. Unfortunately, Sweet Tart trees seem to have trouble achieving full blooms, and have particularly struggled to flower as young trees during mild winters. Where they do flower,they set fruit extremely well and may even require thinning to achieve improved fruit size. Fruit splitting can also be a problem for Sweet Tart particularly those grown in the interior, and some issues with uneven ripening have been observed. We are evaluating Sweet Tart for its resistance to bacterial spot and rot, as well as its ability to fruit in future seasons. It is a mid-season mango ripening from July to August.

Tahar

Tahar is an ‘Irwin’ seedling from Israel. The fruit are small, ovate in shape and turn a brilliant red color with yellow background color at maturity. The flesh is yellow, soft and completely fiberless. Unfortunately Tahar has very little flavor, tasting extremely mild and has proven unpopular. Despite excellent production, fungal resistance, and a very manageable tree, we elected to topwork our Tahar into Zill 28-18 and take it out of production.

 Tahar is an early season variety here, ripening from June to July.

Taymour

 

This mango is from Egypt, and is sometimes spelled ‘Tymour’. In Egypt it has fallen out of favor due to susceptibility to mango malformation disease. Based on conversations with Egyptian clients, we have reason to doubt whether this tree is the real Taymour. The budwood was obtained from the USDA.

The fruit are ovate in shape, small-to-medium size, turning a light yellow color at maturity, some with a minor amount of pinkish blush. The flesh is yellow, soft, and completely fiberless. The flavor is very sweet and resin dominated, reminiscent of Bombay. 

 It is a vigorous grower with long internodes, which we’ve been able to train into an outward spreading habit so that the tree is about twice as wide as it is tall. It has struggled to bloom during mild winters and doesn’t look like it will be a consistent producer here, which is unfortunate because its eating quality is excellent. Its a mid-season mango here ripening in July.

Tess Pollock

Tess Pollock was selected by Chris Wenzel of Delray Beach, FL and is thought to be a cross between ‘Carrie’ and ‘Turpentine’. 

The fruit is oval shaped, somewhat similar to carrie, turning yellow at maturity. The flesh has a minor amount of fiber, with turpenes in the flavor and a hint of Carrie spice, but not as sweet. Our tree produced it first fruit in 2017 and has grown rather slowly

Thai Everbearing

As the name suggests this mango is from Thailand. It is not truly ‘everbearing’ but is capable of throwing off-season bloom and producing some off-season fruit, not unlike ‘Chokanon’. 


The fruit are very small, turpentine-sized, turning yellow at maturity with a little orange blush. The flesh is fiberless, yellow, and contains a polyembryonic seed. The flavor is of the Thai sort with just a small amount of resin, mostly floral honey notes. Despite being nicely flavored they often get overlooked due to their size.


The tree is a slow grower with spreading habit. They have good resistance to anthracnose.


The fruit are primarily early season ripening from June to July. 

Toledo

 

Toledo is from Cuba, where it is very commonly grown from seed due to being polyembryonic.

The fruit is very small, round-ovate in shape, and turns yellow when ripe with just the tiniest pink blush at the top. The flesh, what little there is, is firm and stringy with classic light sweet flavor. 

The trees are quite dwarfish and slow growing, highly easy to manage. The fruit matures mid-season in south Florida from late June through July.

T

Tommy Atkins

Tommy Atkins was a seedling of ‘Haden’ planted in 1922 and selected in Ft. Lauderdale, FL by Thomas H. Atkins. Atkins submitted his mango to the Variety Committee of the Florida Mango Forum on multiple occasions but it was rejected due its fiber content and flavor. He was convinced of its commercial value however due to its spectacular color, good size, shelf life and very heavy production and succeeded at convincing growers in Dade county to plant it. Indeed ‘Tommy Atkins’ proved itself to be an efficient commercial variety, and it was introduced to Latin America where it became the primary mango of commercial trade in the Western Hemisphere, a title it still holds today. For this reason it is commonly found in the produce section of major supermarkets.


The fruit are oval shaped, medium-to-large in size, with a crimson red blush and green/yellow background color. The flesh is yellow, very firm, moderately fibrous, and contains a monoembryonic seed. The flavor is in the classic group and fairly mild to most. Though it has earned a poor reputation thanks to bad quality commercially imported fruit, locally grown Tommy Atkins are much better than their store-bought counterparts.


The trees are vigorous growers, with a vertical growth habit and open canopy, and are difficult to control in size. They have very good anthracnose resistance and will produce well, even under marginal conditions. 


The fruit are at least somewhat susceptible to bacterial spot and rot fungi, the extent to which is still being determined. Tommy Atkins is a mid-season variety in Florida, ripening from late-June through July.

Torbert

This mango originated in Goulds, FL in the 1940s on the property of the Torbert family, and is sometimes erroneously spelled ‘Torbet’ or ‘Tolbert’. It was most likely a ‘Haden’ seedling and received some attention from the Fairchild Garden fruit program due to the trees manageable growth habit. 


The fruit is small-to-medium sized, with a roundish shape like Haden, developing yellow color with red blush at maturity. The flesh is firm, yellow, with some fiber content, containing a polyembryonic seed. The flavor is kind of mild, and in the classic Florida group. Torbert is an early season mango ripening from June to July.


Torbert trees are compact, have a spreading habit and are somewhat low-vigor growers, some describing it as ‘semi-dwarf’. They are good producers with decent anthracnose resistance, having been able to fruit in Loxahatchee for us without spraying and always fruiting well in West Palm Beach. However we have discovered that it is *highly* susceptible to mango bacterial black spot, and have top-worked the tree into Zill B-22, taking Torbert out of production.

Totapuri

Sometimes spelled ‘Totapari’ and also known as ‘Bangalora’ and ‘Sandersha’, Totapuri is from south India where it is grown on major commercial scale, largely for green consumption. It was introduced to the US in 1901 under the name ‘Sandersha’, and was recognized for fruiting well in south Florida. The ripe flavor was considered mediocre however, and this limited any commercial acceptance. Totapuri’s main claim to fame here is that it was the parent of the ‘Brook’s cultivar, from which a number of major commercial mangos can trace their descendance, including ‘Keitt’, ‘Kent’, ‘Hatcher’, and others. 


The fruit are large, with an oblong, curving shape and raised stem end. They turn yellow at maturity with noticeable pink blush. The flesh is yellow, somewhat fibrous and of rather bland flavor, but it is generally not consumed ripe, instead eaten at the crunchy green stage with condiments. The seed is long and monoembryonic. 


The trees are vigorous growers with spreading, somewhat spindly growth habit and open canopy. We have found Totapuri to be highly prone to the new rot fungi diseases and it appears to have passed the genes favoring  susceptibility to its descendants. Fortunately, we sell almost all the fruit at the green stage long before the fruit reaches maturity when the rot becomes a problem. Totapuri is a mid-late-season mango ripening from late July through August.

Turpentine

Turpentine refers to a seedling race of mangos that are commonly found in the Caribbean (often referred to as ‘Stringies’ in Jamaica) and were likely the first type of mangos to be successfully introduced to Florida in the 1860s from Cuba. The first Turpentines were planted in the Coconut Grove area of Miami near Snapper Creek, and other plantings were made shortly after near West Palm Beach and Bradenton, quickly spreading elsewhere. Because they are generally grown from seed, there are various iterations of ‘Turpentine’ in existence. A Turpentine mango was the pollinating parent of the ‘Haden’ variety, and thus most Florida mangos can trace at least part of their ancestry to it. It is also the most common rootstock used in Florida, so if you have a grafted mango tree there’s a good chance its grafted to a type of Turpentine. 


The fruit tend to be very small, roundish to ovate in shape and yellow in color developing some pinkish/orange blush with good sun. The flesh is yellow, extremely fibrous, with what most would recognize as a common classic flavor, though this can vary by type, with some turpentines carrying a stronger resin component and some sweeter, and some even having tolerable fiber. At any rate, a polyembryonic seed occupies most of the space inside of the fruit. Many people elect to juice them rather than attempt to eat them out of hand.


The trees are moderately vigorous growers, though some can be dwarfish, and have a spreading growth habit with dense canopy. We have several Turpentine trees, a few sprouting from below the grafts above them, and one very ancient tree with an enormous trunk that is likely over 100 years old and the oldest tree on the property, probably predating the Sturrock family’s purchasing of the land in 1919. We use the Turpentine fruits for rootstock and sell them as such as well, but some people enjoy them for eating especially customers from Jamaica who have fond memories of the “stringies” back home. They are a mid-season mango here in Florida, ripening from late June through July. 

Tyler Premier

This mango is from Kenya and is sometimes just called ‘Tyler’ (not to be confused with a mango by the same name found in Merritt Island). It has a distinctive round shape similar to that of Cushman or Rumani. 

We planted a Tyler Premier in 2017 for evaluation. 

Ugly Betty

Ugly Betty was a seedling of ‘Carrie’ from the breeding program of Gary Zill in Boynton Beach, FL (planting # 7-20). 


The fruit are oval-ovate in shape with a very uneven, bumpy surface, with a light green-yellow skin color at maturity with mottled pink blush. The flesh is yellow, fiberless, and very soft. It has a very good flavor that is similar to Carrie, with plenty of spice notes, a hint of resin, and rich sweetness, belonging in the Alphonso-Indian flavor class. The tree has a spreading growth habit and has been a stagnant grower for us.  Its production has been unimpressive thus far, as has been the case for other Ugly Betty trees we’ve had the opportunity to observe. Making matters worse, our Ugly Betty has been a favored target of Sri Lankan weevils, which have repeatedly consumed much of the foliage. On the positive side, the tree has shown an ability to fruit in marginal growing territory in Loxahatchee so it does possess at least some anthracnose tolerance. It is a mid-season mango here, fruiting primarily in July.

V

Val-Carrie

This mango is speculated to have been a cross between a Valencia Pride and Carrie mango, and was selected as a random seedling by the Zill family in Boynton Beach, FL. It has an oblong shape, medium-sized and  turning a light yellow at maturity. The flesh is soft, orange-yellow in color and fiberless, containing a monoembryonic seed. It has a strong aroma and the flavor itself is very strong, with similar turpenes to the Carrie but a little sweeter and spicier, to such a degree that some people find it overwhelming. However, many people from India and the West Indies really love its interesting Alphonso-class flavor.


The trees are typically moderately vigorous growers, though we have a producing 6+ year old tree is still quite small. Their growth habit it somewhat upright but can be trained. Val-Carrie is an under-planted mango that often goes forgotten, and we are evaluating it for its long-term production traits. 


The fruit have good anthracnose resistance and better shelf life than Carrie. Val-Carrie is an early season mango, ripening from June to July here.


Valencia Pride

A member of the classic Florida mango group, Valencia Pride originated as a ‘Haden’ seedling planted  in Miami, FL in 1937, fruiting in 1941. It was quickly recognized for its attractive appearance, good flavor and production traits and propagation began in the 1940s resulting in it becoming a common backyard mango over a period of decades.


The fruit are large and wide, oblong-sigmoid shaped, with yellow background color and pinkish blush covering much of the fruit well before maturity. The flesh is firm, light yellow, with only scanty fiber, containing a monoembryonic seed. The flavor is of the classic sort, medium sweet with light stone fruit and honey character. The sweetness can vary considerably year to year on Valencia Pride.

 

The trees have an earned reputation as fast, vigorous growers with vertical growth habit and open canopy. They must be trained well and not overfed to keep their size in check. Due to this factor Valencia Pride is a poor choice for people who require a small tree, but they can provide excellent shade. They have good anthracnose resistance and will even fruit well in the humid western communities of Palm Beach county. They can be alternate bearers for some, but have been steady and good producers for us. Sometimes the fruit can be prone to splitting open on the tree, particularly after heavy rainfall. They are a midseason mango, ripening primarily from late-June into August.  

Vallenato

This mango is from Valledupar, Colombia, and was originally being called ‘Manzano’. It was introduced to Florida in 1991 by Carl Campbell and has received some attention is the US after being named a ‘Curator’s Choice’ mango by Fairchild Tropical Garden on several occasions.


The fruit are oval, small, and turn a crimson red color with yellow background at maturity. The flesh is firm, yellow, with some fiber containing a polyembryonic seed. The flavor is mild and sweet, in the classic group and comparable to ‘Irwin’. 


The trees are vigorous growers with spreading, open canopy and have good anthracnose resistance. Production tends to be very good.  Vallenato is a early-season mango in Florida, ripening from June to July. We planted a small tree in 2017 for evaluation.

Van Dyke

The Van Dyke mango was a seedling of ‘Haden’ planted in the 1930s on the property of Madeline Van Dyke, first fruiting in the 1940s. The tree was seen as more productive and anthracnose resistant than Haden giving it some commercial potential. In the 1950s nurseries began to graft it and Van Dyke was planted commercially, eventually being introduced overseas. 


The fruit are small-to-medium sized, oval shaped with a small beak, and tend to turn red well before maturity, developing some yellow background color as they turn ripe. The flesh is yellow, firm, with a minor amount of fiber, containing a monoembryonic seed. The flavor is sweet, medium-bodied and peachy, belonging to the classic-group and tasting nearly identical to Haden. In fact, we often recommend Van Dyke to customers seeking Haden fruit when they aren’t available because the flavor is so similar. At times in high-nitrogen soils the fruit can develop jelly seed and because of this should be allowed to ripen off the tree. In our sandy soil Van Dyke doesn't seem to have this problem.


The trees are very vigorous growers with long internodes, having an upright growth habit with very open canopy, and are not easy to control for size. They have reasonably good anthracnose resistance especially compared to Haden, and can produce well in most areas. 


Van Dyke has a slightly later season, ripening from late June through July.

Vellai Colomban

This is a large-fruited mango from Sri Lanka and probably the second most popular mango in that country after Karutha Colomban. It is known for being able to fruit in wet areas mangos don’t typically do well in. 

We obtained a tree in 2017 and are evaluating it for its ability to flower in warmer wi

Venus

Venus was a seedling of Zill Indochinese (Zinc) from the breeding program of Gary Zill in Boynton Beach, FL (planting # 33-10). We speculate that one of ‘Kent’ or ‘Beverly’ may have been the pollen parent. 


The fruit are round in shape, medium sized, and turn yellow with some light red blush at maturity. The flesh is firm, fiberless, and light yellow in color. The flavor is nothing short of excellent, with a decadent  and complex mix of sweetness and acidity that most people who try it fall in love with. Sometimes the fruit can ripen a bit unevenly, like its sibling the Sweet Tart. Nonetheless, it is one of the finest tasting mangos you can eat.


The trees are upright, moderately vigorous growers with open canopy, and have excellent anthracnose resistance of the flowers and fruit. Unfortunately, we have discovered Venus to be highly prone to bacterial black spot of the fruit, which in turn seems to make it more prone to rotting fungi. For this reason, we can’t recommend the tree to backyard growers, and have begun top-working our Venus trees into other varieties.


Venus is a mid-season variety with its primary crop typically occurring from July to August, though we have had some May fruit from them the last several years.

W - Y - Z

Wester

This mango was an Edward seedling selected by David Sturrock from his breeding program begun in the 1950s in West Palm Beach, FL and was originally labelled ‘Edward x Earle #15’, a designation which is still carries at TREC in Homestead. It was named after P.J. Wester who once headed the USDA’s Plant Introduction facility in Miami.  The pollen parent was a Philippine-Carabao type called the ‘Earle’. 


The fruit is oblong, medium sized, and turns dull yellow at maturity. The flesh is soft, yellow, fiberless, and contains a polyembryonic seed. The flavor is of the Philippine/Indochinese group, mild with soft floral notes and a small bit of acidity. The fruit is highly resistant to anthracnose. 


The trees are medium vigor growers with spreading habit and open canopy. The production is fairly good and the fruit ripen mid-season from late June through July.

White Piri

White Piri is from Hawaii, and presumably derived from the Indian Pirie (aka Pairi or Paheri, which may also be synonymous with the Jamaican ‘Bombay’). It is a larger fruit than the regular Pirie though and has a distinctive, superior flavor. It is one of the most commonly grown mangos in Hawaii after ‘Haden’.


The fruit is medium-sized, round in shape similar to ‘Kent’, and turns yellow with beautiful pastel red and orange blush at maturity. The flesh is yellow, medium-firm, and fiberless with a lovely aroma, containing a monoembryonic seed. The flavor is fantastic, wonderfully rich and sweet with abundant spice notes and a resin component reminiscent of ‘Bombay’. 

White Piri has a deep, complex flavor with a lot going on. It has become one of our favorite mangos and we have received great feedback on it from customers. We recently top-worked a second tree into it.


The tree has been a slow grower for us, with spreading and open growth habit. They do not appear to be as vigorous as regular Pairi/Bombay trees, and seem to flower younger. Based on reports it is not anthracnose resistant in Hawaii and is probably not a mango well suited for the humid interior areas of south Florida, but it seems to perform well near the coast. 

The fruit themselves are anthracnose resistant; White Piri’s only disease issue here seems to be powdery mildew on its flowers. The fruit ripen mid-season during July. 

Winters

This is a medium sized fruit that is nicely colored. We don’t have much experience with it but planted a Winters tree in 2017 for evaluation.


Wise

Wise was selected by David Burd of Naples, FL. It is a large, ugly round mango that turns yellow-green at maturity. The flesh is very firm, yellow, with a minimal amount of fiber. The seed is monoembryonic. The flavor belongs in the classic group and can be quite good during dry conditions, mild and straightforward in wetter weather. Production thus far has been light given the tree's size due to inadequate flowering, but the potential for heavy crops exists. We are concerned about its disease resistance going forward. The tree is a vigorous grower with vertical growth habit and open canopy. Wise is a mid-late season mango ripening from July to August.

Young

Young is a selection from the breeding program of David Sturrock in West Palm Beach, FL in the 1960s, and was originally labelled ‘Edward x Kent #14’. ‘Edward’ was its maternal parent and ‘Kent’ the pollen parent. Sturrock liked the fruit and saw enough good qualities in it that he elected to patent it, making Young one of the few patented mangos. Decades later, Pine Island Nursery in Miami began propagating the Young under the erroneous label ‘Tebow’, so if you have a tree marked such you actually have a ‘Young’. 


The fruit are roundly shaped, very similar to Kent, and are medium-to-large in size, turning yellow at maturity with pink blush covering much of the top when sun exposed. The flesh is firm, fiberless, and yellow, containing a small monoembryonic seed. The flavor is very mild and delicate, belonging in the classic group and reminds one of mixed fruit juice. 

The trees are moderately vigorous growers with spreading, open canopy. They have good anthracnose resistance and set fruit prolifically, and can be very heavy producers. We have found that it does have some degree of susceptibility to rotting fungi, though nowhere near as bad as Kent. Young is a mid-season mango here, ripening from July to August. 

Zebda

Zebda is from Egypt, where it is very widely grown and often used at the very ripe stage for making drinks and processing. 


The fruit are medium-sized, ovately shaped, turning a dull yellow color when ripe, often staying light green when grown inland. The flesh is very soft, melting, fiberless, with a floral syrupy flavor found in several other Egyptian varieties. It contains a polyembryonic seed. 

The fruit have good shelf life when harvested green.



The tree is a sluggish grower with spreading, dense canopy. Production would be good if the tree flowered regularly, but like other Egyptian cultivars it hasn’t done so frequently in the warm winters we’ve experienced the last several years. Zebda does has very good anthracnose resistance though and successfully fruited for us in humid Loxahatchee. It is a mid-season variety here, ripening from late June into July.

Z

Zill

The Zill cultivar was a ‘Haden’ seedling planted on the property of Carl King in Lake Worth, FL in 1922, and first fruited in 1930. Pedigree analysis has indicated that ‘Bombay’ may have been one of its parents as well. Laurence Zill, a commercial fisherman turned-mango nurseryman, took interest in the tree and later had it moved to his property in Delray Beach, FL. Thereafter it took on the family name and received a considerable amount of propagation, even being planted commercially on some level in south Florida during the 1940s and 50s.


The fruit are small, ovate in shape with a small beak, turning purple well before maturity and later developing an attractive red with yellow background color as they ripen. The flesh is yellow, soft, fiberless, and contains a small monoembryonic seed. The flavor is in the classic group, moderately sweet with notes of peach and hints of pineapple. The fruit have excellent resistance to post-harvest anthracnose, but tend to develop internal breakdown if they ripen on the tree. They can take on an unpleasant musky smell and taste when they go overripe, so Zill is a mango best harvested while still firm.


The trees are vigorous growers with spreading growth habit and open canopy. They possess very good fungal resistance and fruit well in the interior areas also. Zill is an early season mango ripening from May to July.

Zillate

This mango was a chance seedling selected by the Zill family in Boynton Beach, FL decades ago and has been speculated to be a cross between Palmer and Tommy Atkins. A USDA pedigree analysis estimated Keitt as a likely parent, to whom it bears no resemblance . Regardless of parentage though, Zillate was propagated to some degree by the Zill nursery but discontinued due to uneven ripening issues.


The fruit are medium-to-large, oblong in shape and develop a deep purple color long before reaching maturity, much like Palmer. They turn red with yellow background color as they begin to ripen. The flesh is yellow, firm, with minimal fiber and contains a monoembryonic seed. The flavor is quite good, particularly for a late season mango. It belongs in the classic flavor group and has notes of dried stone fruit with honeyed sweetness. As mentioned, the flesh can sometimes ripen unevenly, though this hasn’t been a major issue with ours.

The fruit has good anthracnose resistance but is at least partially susceptible to mango bacterial black spot and rot fungi, the degree to which we are still trying to determine.


The trees have a spreading growth habit with open canopy and long internodes. Ours is considerably wider than it is tall. They are moderately vigorous growers, and can be heavy producers. Zillate ripens from late July through August.

Zill Indochinese (Zinc)

This mango was selected by the Zill family in Boynton Beach, FL and was probably a chance seedling of ‘Cambodiana’, possibly with a Florida-Indian type as another parent. Though named ‘Zill Indochinese’, it is commonly shortened to ‘Zinc’. It is a parent of a number of mangos released from the Zill breeding program in recent years.


The fruit are small-to-medium sized, round in shape, turning light yellow at maturity with a small amount of blush at the top. The flesh is firm, yellow, with an indochinese aroma very similar to that of ‘Cambodiana’, containing a polyembryonic seed. The flavor is very good, in the Indochinese-hybrid group with bright floral sweetness coupled with an acidity component to balance it out. Some people describe it as a little “chalky” but we like it. They can sometimes encounter issues with uneven ripening.


The trees are moderately vigorous growers with spreading, open canopy. They and their fruit have good resistance to anthracnose and produce at a moderate rate. 

Zinc is not currently propagated commercially though so trees may be hard to come by. It is a mid-season variety and the fruit ripen from July to August.

Zill 0

We don’t really know anything about this mango, but planted a tree in 2017 for observation. In 2018, the small tree was allowed to carry a fruit to maturity, which didn't seem to set the growth back. Subsequently after flushing growth, the tree flowered again in the off-season and had 3 ripe fruits in December. The fruit is small, yellow, sigmoid shaped with fiberless flesh that has an Indochinese flavor. Its off-season fruit production made us think it could be Chokanon (though the flavor seemed different), or a related Thai cultivar known as 'Sam Ru Du'. At this point we still aren't sure of its origins and will continue to evaluate it.

Zill O-29

This was a selection from the breeding program of Gary Zill in Boynton Beach, FL and is supposed to be a good producer of attractively colored fruit. We’ve had ours in the ground several years and it has yet to flower.


Zill 28-18 (Fruit Cocktail)

This was a Jakarta seedling from the breeding project of Gary Zill in Boynton Beach, FL. It has reportedly been a disappointing producer. 


The fruit is roundly shaped, medium sized, and turns yellow. The flesh is fiberless and has an extravagantly rich bouquet and flavor, with different spice notes, some turpenes, medium sweetness, and reminiscent of packeted fruit juice you may have enjoyed with lunch as a child. It appears to be a mid-season variety. 

We topworked a Tahar tree into Fruit Cocktail in 2017 for further evaluation.

Z

Zill 34-24 (Cecilove)

34-24 was a Carrie seedling from the breeding program of Gary Zill in Boynton Beach, FL. 'Zill indochinese' (‘Zinc’) is thought to have been its pollen parent. It has since been given the name ‘Cecilove’ by Richard Campbell, who has taken a liking to the fruit and named it after his wife. 

We planted several of the trees in 2017 for evaluation. The fruit is yellow, ovately shaped, and has outstanding eating quality, wit the flavor firmly in the Indochinese-hybrid group and very close to that of  the candied-sweetness flavor of 'Sweet Tart'. Only as Cecilove gets on the riper side is there any detection of Carrie-notes, and these are rather faint and limited. 

We are very excited about this mango due to potentially good bacterial spot and rot resistance stemming from its Carrie parentage. This may prove important as other mangos in this flavor group (Venus and Sweet Tart) may prove too disease prone to continue growing. We have top-worked a larger tree into Cecilove and may yet add more.

Zill 40-26

40-26 was a Julie seedling from the breeding project of Gary Zill in Boynton Beach, FL. It may have ‘Gary’ in its parentage as well. We planted a small tree in 2015 or 16 and it produced some fruit in 2017. 

They are very small, oval shaped and turn greenish-yellow at maturity, softening while still on the tree. 

The flesh is soft, yellow and fiberless... The flavor is exceptional, in the coconut flavor group with terrific sweetness. It tastes very similar to the Piña Colada mango.

We’re excited about this one and may topwork another tree into it.

Zill-80

Zill-80 is thought to have been a ‘Kent’ seedling, and was selected by the Zill family in Boynton Beach, FL, so named because it first fruited in 1980. It was grafted by the Zill nursery for some time in the 1980s but later discontinued. The fruit are large, roundly shaped, developing yellow color with bright red blush at maturity. The flesh is firm, fiberless, and yellow, containing a monoembryonic seed. The flavor is in the classic-acid group and very delicious, with mixed notes of citrus and peach and a very tangy component that many people enjoy. 


The fruit can sometimes has issues with uneven ripening for some. 

The trees are moderately vigorous growers with spreading dense canopy. They have good anthracnose resistance and produce fairly well. Unfortunately it is likely Zill-80 possesses at least some susceptibility to bacterial spot and rot fungi, the extent to which we are still attempting to verify. We planted a small tree in 2017 for evaluation.

Zill-80 is a late season mango ripening from late July  through primarily August.

Zill E-4 (Sugarloaf)

This mango was an Edward seedling from the breeding program of Gary Zill in Boynton Beach, FL. Either ‘Gary’ or ‘Pettigrew’ may have been its pollen parent, though Pettigrew seems likely due to physiological traits. The fruit are rather ugly, obliquely oval in shape with a greenish-yellow color at maturity. The flesh is light yellow, soft, fiberless, and can sometimes ripen unevenly. The flavor is an incredible coconut explosion with a strong dessert-like sweetness. We think it tastes like the inside of a Mounds candy bar. We have planted several trees and topworked another tree into E-4 for further evaluation. In 2018, it was given the name 'Sugarloaf' by Gary Zill.

Zill M-4

This mango was a ‘Keitt’ seedling from the breeding program of Gary Zill in Boynton Beach, FL. ‘Gary’ was its likely pollen parent. 

The fruit has a strong delicious flavor belonging in the coconut group. The original tree is a heavy producer some years but has been an alternate bearer, and until recently there have been no other producing trees to observe. It is very late season, ripening from August through September. 

We have planted several M-4 trees and topworked half of a large tree into it as well for evaluation as a potential late-season alternative to Keitt if it can prove itself resistant to bacterial spot and rot.

Zill M-10

Selected from Gary Zill’s breeding program in Boynton Beach, FL.

We obtained several M-10 trees in 2017.

Z

Zill M-17

This was a ‘Carrie’ seedling from the breeding program of Gary Zill in Boynton Beach, FL and of reportedly very good eating quality. 

We obtained several M-17 trees in 2017.

Zill O-15

Zill O-15 was a seedling of ‘Jakarta’ from the breeding program of Gary Zill in Boynton Beach, FL. It is a medium-sized mango, ovately shaped and turning yellow at maturity. The flesh is fiberless, yellow, and firm. The flavor excellent,is highly resinous, reminiscent of Jakarta but probably sweeter, belonging in the Indian/West Indian flavor class.

The original tree is productive, but the fruit tend to ripen in a very short span, only a couple weeks. 

We topworked a tree into O-15 in 2017 for evaluation.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

New Varieties

Bullock’s Heart

This mango is found in Australia, and has a dark red color at maturity. 

There also appear to be other mangos in other parts of the world known as ‘Bullock’s Heart’. So we are not sure if what we have, which was obtained from the USDA in Miami, is the same mango from Australia.

Ford

This mango is from Florida and not widely grown, only contained in some of the collections in Dade county. 

A 2005 pedigree analysis indicated ‘Tommy Atkins’ was likely one of its parents. 


The fruit is large, red in color, and tends to split open on the tree. 


We obtained a small grafted tree in 2018.

Golden Queen?

Also known as Jin Huang, this mango is from Taiwan. It is a cross between ‘Ivory’ and ‘Keitt’, producing enormous fruit. 

They are oblong-sigmoid in shape, staying relatively green at maturity with some minimal pinkish blush at the top of sun exposed fruit, weighing up to several pounds. The flesh is firm, fiberless, and yellow. The flavor is very good, of the Thai-class but with perhaps a little more depth to it. 


The trees are moderately vigorous growers with spreading dense canopy. The foliage resembles that of Keitt but the flowers have superior anthracnose resistance. 

We had a tree labelled 'Kiew Yai' in Loxahatchee Groves that fruited consistently well. Based on the traits of the fruit and tree, we suspect this is actually 'Golden Queen'

We planted a small one in West Palm Beach in 2017 with budwood obtained from the Loxahatchee tree. It is late season in Florida maturing from August to September. 

Himsagar

 

Himsagar is one of the most popular cultivars grown in north India, West Bengal, and Bangladesh. Unfortunately, it is not clear if the variety commonly known as Himsagar in that region can even be found in Florida. We have a tree we obtained from a nursery in southwest Florida, who received their original budwood for their own tree from a man named Ron Hensley who had travelled to India and brought it back in the 1990s. 

This ‘Himsagar’ based on descriptions does not sound like the Himsagar in West Bengal, which is a round fruit shaped similarly to the Florida ‘Kent’. So we aren’t quite sure what our ‘Himsagar’ tree is, but it has never flowered for us prior to 2018 despite being large enough to do so for several years. Finally it sent out one panicle and produced several fruits in 2018; these dropped as they neared maturity and did not ripen properly. They had an oval-oblong kidney-shape. Adding to the confusion is that the ‘Himsagar’ contained in the collection of the USDA seems to also be a separate cultivar as well (see ‘Lehore Himsagar’). 

Iman Passand

This mango is somewhat common in southern India where it originated, and is also known as ‘Himayat’, ‘Himayudin’ and other similar names. It is a medium sized, oval shaped fruit that turns a greenish-yellow at maturity. The flesh is medium firm, fiberless, and yellow in color, containing a monoembryonic seed. The flavor is outstanding, with a strong and interesting perfumey quality to it, with plenty of sweetness and spice notes.


The trees have a low-vigour spreading growth habit. After growing a mislabelled ‘Iman Passand’ for several years, we suspect the Iman Passand trees in south Florida and Hawaii may actually be the same mango as ‘Alampur Baneshan’. 

We obtained some small Iman Passand graftlings in 2018 and will evaluate them to determine if they are  any different.


Madras

This mango is from the Madras area of India, and reportedly of excellent  eating quality. 

We obtained a small tree in 2018 for evaluation.

New Varieties

Mamita

We obtained this mango in 2018 but don’t know anything about it.

Neldika

This mango is from Africa. We don’t know much about it but obtained some grafted trees in 2018.


Paheri


Also spelled ‘Pairi’ and ‘Piri’, this mango may be synonymous with ‘Bombay’ in Jamaica. It was introduced to the US in 1902 from Mumbai, and later a different tree was introduced from Poona under the same name but was slightly different. Either way, it is an older variety in India, small and ovate in shape, fiberless, and considered to be of very good eating quality, with a rich, sweet and spicy flavor. It is considered a vigorous tree. The fruit mature mid-season, from July to August. We obtained small grafted Paheri trees in 2018.

Pedda Rassam

This mango is from Andhra Pradesh, India where it is grown on some commercial scale. It is sometimes spelled ‘Pedda Rasalu’. It is medium-to-large in size, oblong shaped with a hooked nose, tending to stay green at maturity. They are commonly used as juice mangos in south India. 

We obtained several young grafted Pedda  Rasam trees in 2018.

S-10

This is a seedling of ‘Saigon’ (USDA accession # MIA4329), which was itself a selection of the ‘Saigon’ brought from Vietnam in 1904. So S-10 is a seedling of a seedling of ‘Saigon’. It reportedly medium sized, yellow with some pink blush, with a fiberless flesh.

The flavor is said to be an excellent mild ‘citrusy’ type. We obtained S-10 from the USDA in 2018 for evaluation. 

Seedling of MIA 19452

We obtained this mango from the USDA and know nothing about it.

New Varieties

Vanraj

Vanraj is from Gujarat state, India commonly grown in Vadrodra district. The fruit is medium-sized, ovate-oblong in shape, and turns red color at maturity. The trees are considered good producers. We obtained a grafted tree in 2018.

White Alphonso

This mango was introduced to the US from India in 1908, and is thought to be a variation of ‘Alphonso’, producing fruit larger in size than the classic variety. The eating quality is reportedly outstanding. The tree at the USDA in Miami has produced well and is over 100 years old now. We obtained a few small White Alphonso trees in 2018 and look forward to evaluating it here.

12-47

We obtained this mango in 2018.

.

.

.

New Varieties

As-ul-Muqarrar

This variety is from central India, around the area of Lucknow. It is from the orchard of Haji Kalimullah, and reportedly heart-shaped. We grafted it to a 'Lemon Zest' stump in 2018 for evaluation.

Gilas

Gilas is an old variety from India. Reportedly it is considered a "sucking mango", but it is unclear if this means it is fibrous or not. We grafted it to a 'Manzanillo' stump in 2018.

Crystal

This is a seedling from Gary Zill's breeding program in Boynton Beach, FL. It was a seedling of 'Zill-80' and originally planting number 1-29. We grafted 'Crystal' to a 'Lemon Zest' stump in 2018 for evaluation. 

Prince

'Prince' is from the area of Lucknow, India and is known for being grown in the orchard of Haji Kalimullah Khan. The fruit are oval shaped and yellow at maturity. We grafted it to a 'Manga Blanca' stump in 2018.

Sey Pasala

We don't know anything about the background of this cultivar but grafted it to a 'Lemon Zest' stump in 2018 for evaluation. 

Hong Sa

This mango is from Thailand, and commonly consumed green. The fruit is sigmoid shaped, mostly yellow but obtaining some pinkish blush. We obtained a small 'Hong Sa' tree in 2018.

New Varieties

BD 34-89

This mango is from Israel. We obtained a small grafted tree in 2018. 

Kuhn See

Also spelled 'Mun Khun Si', this mango is from Thailand and is primarily consumed green at various stages. The tree itself has a low/dwarfish growth habit. 

Dou Douce

This mango is from Trinidad, and is spelled a variety of different ways (Du  Dus, Dou Doux, etc). It is commonly grown from seed in Trinidad and Tobago, and there are numerous "versions" of it of apparently varying quality. We grafted it in 2018 out of curiosity. 

Leshem

This mango is from Israel, roundly shaped and developing red blush. We don't know much else about it but obtain a small grafted tree in 2018.

Royal Special

This mango is from India, where it is also known by the name 'Punasa'. The fruit is small, roundly shaped, and mostly green. It is commonly used green for purposes such as pickles and chutneys, rather than consumed ripe. In India it is known for having multi crops per year, including in the off-season. It has been promoted as a cultivar for ultra-high density growing in the Andhra Pradesh state.

S-1

S-1 from the USDA in Miami and is a seedling of a Saigon-seedling (MIA 4329, which was a seedling of PI 11645).  It has been described as a yellow, medium-sized fruit having a pleasant, mild taste. We obtained a small grafted tree in 2018.

New Varieties

Sheila

We obtained this mango from the Miami-Dade Fruit and Spice Park based on the recommendation of several people who were fond of it. We don't know if it is the same as a 'Sheila' mango found in India but we doubt it. We grafted it in 2018.

Shew Ya Za Ma

We obtained this mango from the Miami-Dade Fruit and Spice Park in 2018 based only off impressive production and fruit size. We know nothing else about it or its origins as there is no literature  referencing it. 

Suvarnarekha

This cultivar originated from Visakapatanam in Andhra Pradesh, India. It is also known as 'Chinnasuvarnarekha' , 'Latsundar' in Odisha, and 'Sundari' in northern India. The fruit is ovate-oblong in shape, medium-sized and yellow with a jasper red blush. In India It is very early season and a strong producer. The fruit is considered to be of good quality and very juicy. We grafted it in 2018. 

Zill 3-12

This mango is from Gary Zill's breeding program in Boynton Beach, FL and was a 'Keitt' seedling. 'East Indian' may have been its pollen parent. The tree makes a fruit that has a flavor reminiscent of 'East Indian' but without the considerable level of fiber, and thus can be sliced and eaten instead of just used for juicing.

Zill 3-18 (Honey)

A selection from Gary Zill, this was a seedling of 'Julie', and 'Gary' may have been the pollen parent. It has sometimes been called 'Honey' but hasn't been propagated. 

Zill 23-2

23-2 is a 'Keitt' seedling, with 'gary' as its likely pollen parent, thus making it a potential sibling of 'M-4' and 'Cotton Candy'. The original tree has been a very late producer over the years. We are evaluating it as a potential alternative to existing late-season varieties should it prove resistant to bacterial black spot and rot.

New Varieties

ZIll 32-5

This is a seedling of 'Zill Indochinese' (Zinc) from the breeding program of Gary Zill in Boynton Beach, FL. The original tree is *highly* productive, with a mild-indochinese flavored fruit that can get washed out, perhaps due to over-production affecting sugar content. We grafted 32-5 in 2018 to evaluate its performance at our location. 

Zill 33-8

From Gary Zill's breeding program in Boynton Beach, FL. A seedling of 'Zill Indochinese', possibly with 'Carrie' as its pollinating parent. The original tree is a strong producer. We grafted 33-8 in 2018 to evaluate it further.

Zill 34-15

34-15 is from Gary Zill's breeding program in Boynton Beach, FL and is a seedling of 'Val-Carrie'. 'Zill Indochinese' (Zinc) may have been 34-15's pollen parent. The flavor is in the Indochinese group and the original tree has performed well. We are interested in this mango due to the flavor group it belongs to coupled with potential bacterial black spot and rot resistance due to its 'Val-Carrie' parentage. We grafted 34-15 to a 'Lemon Zest' stump for further evaluation. 

Zill 36-8 (India)

'India' is the name that has been given to 36-8, a seedling of 'Zill-80' from the breeding program of Gary Zill in Boynton Beach, FL. 'Jakarta' may have been its pollen parent. The fruit is roundly shaped like its maternal parent, and its flavor is reminiscent of 'Zill-80' as well though perhaps superior. 36-8 trees appear to have been steady and heavy producers. The fruit does not ripen well on the tree, but when harvested mature green and allowed to ripen over the course of 10 days or so, the eating quality is excellent. This mango could have commercial potential if it can prove resistant to the new diseases present in south Florida, which we will be evaluating for going forward.

Zill 36-43

From Gary Zill's breeding program in Boynton Beach, FL, 36-43 was a seedling of 'Bombay'. Like its parent, the original tree has been a very vigorous grower and has also struggled to flower some years. 

Zill 40-17

From Gary Zill's breeding program in Boynton Beach, FL. We don't remember its reported parentage.

Z

Zill B-22

From Gary Zill's breeding program in Boynton Beach, FL. B-22 is a large, round fruit that turns reddish color. We topworked our Torbert tree into it to evaluate.

Zill C-17

C-17 is a seedling of 'Zill-80' from Gary Zill's breeding program in Boynton Beach, FL. 'Gary' may have been its pollinating parent. Like other 'Zill-80' progeny we are evaluating it among potential mid-to-late season alternatives to older disease-prone cultivars.

Zill J-14

From Gary Zill's breeding program in Boynton Beach, FL, J-14 is a seedling of 'Zill Indochinese' (Zinc).  The fruit is medium-sized and oval shaped. 

Zill L-17

L-17 is a seedling of 'Zill Indochinese' (Zinc) from the breeding program of Gary Zill in Boynton Beach, FL. The fruit are medium sized, oval shaped and turn yellow at maturity. The flavor is in the Indochinese hybrid class.

Zill N-12

N-12 is a seedling from Gary Zill's breeding program in Boynton Beach, FL. 

-

-