Mango Descriptions

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Jewel

This mango is probably descended from Irwin and was selected by the Zill family of Boynton Beach, FL over 40 years ago. It’s a small-to-medium sized fruit, ovately shaped and turns a brilliant red color well before maturity, making harvesting somewhat tricky. 


The flesh is yellow, with flavor is very, very mild and in the classic group. 

Jewel is early season and ripens from June to July. The tree has a low rate of growth and spreading habit. Though it produces well, we have found it susceptible to bacterial black spot and rot fungi, and have cut the tree back to be topworked. 


 

To continue reading more information y/o descriptions of our mango collection, click here

Juicy Peach

Juicy Peach is from the breeding program of Gary Zill in Boynton Beach, FL (planting number F-29), reportedly a seedling of Tommy Atkins that may have had ‘Gary’ as its pollen parent. The fruit are roundish yellow developing pink blush at the top as they approach maturity. The flesh is *very* soft, fiberless, with a lovely bright peach flavor that many people enjoy. The fruit has a short shelf life unfortunately and stores/handles poorly due to its exceptionally soft flesh. 

The tree itself is a very vigorous grower with spreading growth habit and dense canopy. We have been a little disappointed in its fruit-retention and production overall. Juicy Peach is a mid-season variety ripening mostly in July.

Julie

Julie is from the West Indies, and people debate whether it is from Trinidad or Jamaica. Regardless, it is beloved in both places, sometimes going under the name ‘Saint Julien’. It was probably introduced to Florida in the 1930s, and a number of Florida mangos can trace their ancestry to it. 


The fruit are small, oval and a little ‘boxy’ shaped. They are green with a small amount of pink blush at maturity. The flesh is quite soft, with a minor amount of fiber, rich in spice with a dash of coconut flavor and plenty of sweetness, making its flavor group difficult to classify. They can be difficult to determine maturity properly, and their window period for eating once ripe is quite short. Production in Florida has typically been disappointing, with the best producing Julies usually occurring along the coast; in the interior JUlie suffers from poor fruit set and is beset with fungal issues. 


The tree are naturally very dwarf, with compact horizontal growth habit. They will often flower multiple times during the course of winter, often leading to two separate crops with some ultra ealy fruit coming from April to May. They are an early season mango though with a majority of the fruit maturing between June and July. 

Juliette

The Juliette is a seedling of ‘Julie’ from the breeding program of Gary Zill in Boynton Beach, FL (planting # HE-4). The fruit are fairly small, oval shaped somewhat similar to Julie, turning a light yellow-green color at maturity with less pink blush than its parent. The flesh is very soft, fiberless, and has a rich Indian spice flavor that we and others believe tastes more similar to ‘Carrie’ than ‘Julie’. 


The trees are definitely more vigorous growers than Julie, with a more upright growth habit and dense canopy. Production appears steady and reasonably good, and more interestingly the season is mid-late, with the fruit ripening from July into August most years. 

Jumbo Kesar

This mango is reported to be a superior offspring of the Indian Kesar, and was selected in India for having fruit that tasted identical to Kesar but larger and with better disease resistance. It has been grown commercially in India and been widely planted in the Dominican Republic as well. 

Our tree was grafted with budwood obtained from Fairchild Farm, however we are uncertain as to whether ours is truly a Jumbo Kesar as the fruit it has produced are on the small side, though this isn’t uncommon for young trees. It’s been a mid-season producer for us and the fruit have a rich, resinous flavor that is deeply sweet maybe with a hint of melon and other fruit

Karen Michelle

Karen Michelle was an Edward seedling from the breeding program of Gary Zill of Boynton Beach, FL (planting # 1-15). It was named after the wife of Craig Campbell. 


The original tree has reportedly been a very light producer. The fruit are large, ovoid and turn yellow when ripe. The flesh is medium firm, fiberless and has a rich-sweet balanced classic flavor very similar to Edward, with a touch more sweetness than its parent. 

We grafted a tree into Karen Michelle in 2017 to evaluate its production habit.

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Karutha Colomban

This mango is from Sri Lanka, where it is very popular and known for fruiting under wet tropical conditions. We obtained a tree in 2017 and planted it  to evaluate its flowering habit.

Kathy

Kathy was selected from Gary Zill’s breeding program in Boynton Beach, FL (planting # K-3), and was a seedling of the Zill Indochinese (Zinc), making it a sibling of ‘Venus’ and ‘Sweet Tart’. 


The fruit are oval, medium-to-large in size, and turn yellow at maturity. They have a fiberless flesh with a rich, Saigon-Indochinese hybrid type flavor with a milder, less pronounced tart component than that of its siblings. 


The trees appear to be medium-sized growers and the young ones can struggle with fungal problems. Its a mid-season mango maturing from July to August. 

We planted Kathy in 2017.

Keitt

The Keitt mango was certainly a seedling of ‘Brooks’ even though it was reported to be from ‘Mulgoba’. It was selected by J.N. Keitt of Homestead, FL in 1945 and quickly received recognition for its heavy and late-season production. Commercial growers rapidly planted it and it became one of the more frequently propagated varieties thereafter. 


The fruit are large-to-very large, weighing over 3 pounds in larger instances, ovoid-round in shape. When grown in the interior they remain green even at maturity but when grown along the coast they develop pretty light red blush with some golden yellow color. The flesh is firm, with scanty fiber, with a classic mango flavor with a little tang. 


The trees have a spindly, spreading growth habit that can make them appear “scraggly”, and they are moderately vigorous growers too. Keitt from ripen from July to September, with some fruit lasting into October in certain years. Their long season often stems from a protracted bloom period, with some fruit being smaller than some of the later fruit. Unfortunately, like other Brooks descendants, we have found that Keitt is very prone to the new bacterial black spot and Botrysphaerial rot fungi diseases and no longer recommend its planting for this reason. We are in the process of topworking our Keitt trees to other varieties.

Kensington Pride

This is the national mango of Australia and has been for many decades and is also known as the ‘Bowen’, after having been discovered in Bowen, Queensland. Its origins are unclear but it is polyembryonic and has been planted from seed throughout the country as well as grafted. 


The fruit are ovate in shape and medium sized, averaging around a pound at maturity. The flesh contains a limited amount of fiber, is yellow with a mild classic mango flavor. They are yellow developing some light red blush on the top half of the fruit. 


The trees are moderately vigorous growers with spreading, open canopies. Their production is eratic and they are susceptible to bacterial spot and botrysphaerial rot diseases. Kensington Pride is an mid season mango in south Florida, maturing from late-June to July.

Kent

Kent was a seedling of ‘Brooks’ grown on the property of Leith Kent of Coconut Grove, FL and a hybrid between Brooks and Haden. It received recognition as being a good quality mango with excellent production characteristics, leading to its quick commercial adaptation. Today, Kent is one of the most widely planted commercial mangos in the Western Hemisphere.


The fruit is round in shape, medium-to-large in size ranging from 1 to 2 pounds. The fruit will turn a background yellow color at maturity with some red blush covering the sun exposed part of the fruit. It has a firm, yet fiberless flesh with a nice medium-sweet peach-noted flavor in the classic group. The flesh can be prone to internal break down if conditions are too wet, and the seed will often sprout inside the fruit. They ripen from late-July to September.


The trees are fairly vigorous, with dense upright canopies. Production tends to be very heavy. Disease resistance is mediocre and anthracnose can be a problem for both flowers and fruit deep in the interior. Sadly Kent is highly prone to mango bacterial black spot and botrysphaerial rot, to such a degree that we do not recommend its planting in south Florida anymore. We began topworking our Kent trees to other varieties in 2017.

Kesar

Kesar is from south India, and very common in Gujarat in particular. It is now grown on a wide commercial scale in India and is very widely recognized among people from there, many viewing it with the same special attachment associated with Alphonso. Unlike Alphonso though, Kesar is an Indian mango that appears to perform fairly well in the climate of south FLorida where we grow it. 


The fruit is somewhat small, ovoid-oblong in shape, and develops yellow color with some small pinkish-red blush at maturity. The flesh is fiberless, very sweet and loaded with spice and turpenes. A true exquisite Indian flavor. 


The trees are low-medium growers with spreading canopy, and quite manageable here. They are a mid-season mango in Florida ripening from late-June through July.

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Keow Savoy

This is a Thai mango, commonly consumed green. At the ripe stage it is fiberless, very sweet and floral with no tart component, like most Thai mangos. 

The fruit is oblong, and turns a light yellow at maturity. The trees are moderately vigorous growers with spreading canopy. Keow Savoy is an early-to-mid season mango in Florida ripening from June into July.

Kook Lom Krong

Kook Lom Krong is from Thailand and reportedly a dwarf tree. We obtained one from Hawaii a few years ago and planted it in 2017.


Lady’s Choice

This mango is a seedling of ‘East Indian’ from the breeding project of Gary Zill in Boynton Beach, FL (planting # L-24). It strongly resembles East Indian in flavor and shape, but was thought to have less problems than its parent in south Florida. 

We planted one in 2017 in the hopes that it will do better than East Indian has for us.

Lancetilla

Lancetilla is famous for being one of the largest mangos in existence. Some specimens have weighed up to 5 pounds but they generally weigh a couple pounds at maturity. It was selected in Lancetilla, Honduras many decades ago and brought to the US by Carl and Richard Campbell. It was later erroneously promoted as a ‘small tree’ or ‘condo mango’, which it absolutely is not. 

The trees are actually vigorous growers and require significant pruning to control. The fruit are ovoid-oblong shaped, green-yellow with light red blush at maturity, and firm, fiberless flesh with a very mild light resin flavor. The fruit have a problem with splitting open while on the tree and can be susceptible to rotting fungi due to skin breaks. 

Lancetilla also tends to drop a disproportionate amount of its young fruit compared to other mangos. For these reasons we do NOT recommend Lancetilla to anyone despite misleading literature on the internet. The fruit ripen from July to August

Langra Benarasi

Langra Benarasi is a medium-sized round mango that develops extensive red blush at maturity. The flesh is yellow with very light fiber, rich and sweet with a nice light resinous finish and some hints of ‘melon’. The fruit have a short shelf life and should be harvested mature and not allowed to tree ripen unless they will be consumed quickly to avoid going overripe. Production is average. 

The trees are very vigorous growers, with dense spreading canopy.  The fruit appear to be moderately susceptible to bacterial spot, and are too anthracnose prone for the deep interior. 

Langra Benarasi is a mid-season mango ripening from late June into July.

Lehore Himsagar

This is the name we have given to the “Himsagar” contained in the collection of the USDA, which has been propagated to some degree in south Florida. It was not resemble the Himsagar of West Bengal and Bangladesh (which is a round fruit shaped similar to ‘Kent’ or ‘Haden’). We’ve given it the name ‘Lehore Himsagar’ because the budwood was sent to the USDA from Lehore, Pakistan along with several other varieties in the early 1960s. 

This mango is slightly oblong in shape, medium-sized and yellow at maturity. The flesh is delightfully rich and sweet in flavor, belonging in the classic flavor group. It appears to be a mid-season mango and the trees are precocious and productive in large pots. 

We have a few of these that we intend to plant in the search for alternative mid-late season varieties. If you have a ‘Himsagar’ tree that was grafted by Zill High Performance Plants, this is the version you have.

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Lemon Meringue (Po Pyu Kalay)

Lemon Meringue (Po Pyu Kalay)

Po Pyu Kalay was introduced to Florida from Myanmar by Maurice Kong, and later given the name ‘Lemon Meringue’ by Gary Zill, which it is now more commonly known as. It is a small, oblong yellow mango with pale yellow, fiberless flesh with a very rich, sweet-citrus dominated flavor that most people adore.  It is one of the most popular mangos among customers who try it, though its flavor can be ‘washed out’ in heavy rains. 


The trees are vigorous, vertical growers with dense foliage and are reasonably good producers. Both the trees and fruit are anthracnose resistant, but they tend to attract a lot of pests and the trees can sometimes suffer dieback problems. The fruit are very susceptible to bacterial black spot. Lemon Meringue is an early season mango, usually fruiting from May to July

Lemon Zest

 

Lemon Zest was a seedling of ‘Lemon Meringue’ from the breeding program of Gary Zill in Boynton Beach, FL (planting # 27-1).

The fruit somewhat resembles Lemon Meringue, a solid yellow color but is larger and more oval-oblong with a small nak at the bottom. Lemon Zest fruits later than Lemon Meringue, more of a July-August season. They are unbelievably richly sweet with candied orange and tangelo citrus flavors dominating, enough to overwhelm the palate for many. 

The trees start out slow but become very vigorous growers with vertical, dense canopy. They are moderately prone to anthracnose at the floral and small fruit stage, and *highly* prone to powdery mildew. They also tend to bloom erratically, sometimes flushing growth in winter season, and these factors conspire to limit production over the long run. Recently it has been discovered that Lemon Zest is highly prone to bacterial black spot disease as well. Given all these unfortunate factors, we do NOT recommend the planting of Lemon Zest and have begun the process of topworking our trees to other cultivars.

Little Gem

This mango was a seedling of Julie from the breeding program of Gary Zill of Boynton Beach, FL (planting #29-26) that may have been a hybrid between Julie and Gary. 

The fruit are very small, bearing in clusters on the original tree and reportedly consistently productive. Fruit size may be improved with thinning. The fruit are round-oval in shape, greenish-yellow with a hint of red blush at maturity, with fiberless yellow flesh that has a classic Florida mango flavor. 

The trees have a manageable spreading growth habit with open canopy and distinctive leaves that give the appearance of almost curling downward. Little Gem is a mid-season mango ripening largely in July. 

Lily

 

This mango is not the same as the ‘Lily’ contained in the collections in Dade county. The Lily we grew was obtained by error from a nursery in Homestead, and appeared to be some sort of Indian-Indochinese hybrid. The fruit are ovate, yellow, small-to-medium sized, with fiberless flesh and a flavor reminiscent of ‘Florigon’. It is an early season fruit and pretty productive despite being highly powdery mildew-prone. 

The fruit were largely unimpressive over a period of years so we have since topworked the tree into ‘Giselle’. 

Lippens

Lippens was a seedling of Haden selected in Miami, FL by Peter and Irene Lippens planted in 1931 and first fruiting in 1938. It received attention from the FLorida Mango Forum in the 1940s and got publicized and commercially propagated. 

The fruit are ovate, medium sized with a background yellow color developing red-pink blush. The flesh is yellow, fiberless, with a mild classic flavor. 

The trees are moderately vigorous with spreading dense canopy. Lippens is early season, ripening from June to July.

Mabruka

Mabrouka is from Egypt, though there is some speculation it may have been introduced there from India. The fruit are small, oval-ovate in shape with a beak at the bottom, turning yellow when ripe with some red blush at the top. 

The eating quality is reportedly very good.

We planted Mabruka in 2017 for evaluation in our climate.

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Madame Blanc

This mango is from Haiti. It’s a small-to-medium sized oblong fruit with a polyembryonic seed, light yellow flesh that is fairly fibrous and mild/insipid in flavor. It did fruit for us multiple times in Loxahatchee Groves indicating it has some level of fungal resistance, but the eating quality is unimpressive. 

Our Madame Blanc in West Palm Beach has grown rather slowly. It is a mid-season mango in FLorida fruiting primarily in July.

Madame Francis

Madame Francis is from Haiti, and is the most popular and commonly grown mango in the country, seeing considerable commercial acreage. 

The fruit are slightly oblong-kidney shaped, medium sized, and turn solid yellow at maturity. The orange colored flesh contains a polyembryonic seed and has some fiber, which can range from minimal to high depending on the amount of nitrogen its receiving. The flavor is quite rich, sweet and wonderfully strong, with some spice notes but not particularly resinous. 

The trees are vigorous growers with open, spreading canopy. Anthracnose of the flowers is a problem with Madame Francis in the interior but it produces quite well in coastal regions. They require minimal stimulus to bloom and are an early season mango in south Florida, usually ripening from June to July

Magshimim

Magshimim is from Israel. We don’t know much else about planted it but planted one in 2017.

Maha Chanok

Maha Chanok is from Thailand and is thought to be a hybrid between the Ivory mango (aka Nang Klang Wang) and a Florida mango, the Sunset (presumably the Sunset from Bokeelia, FL, not Merritt Island). 


The fruit is oblong and tubular, medium in size, and kind of shaped like a hot dog. The flesh is of medium-firmness, completely fiberless containing a thin monoembryonic seed, with a wonderful bouquet and delightfully sweet, floral flavor with enough of a tart component to balance it out and differentiate it from other Thai mangos such as Nam Doc Mai. They have a long shelf life and turn yellow with gorgeous pink blush on much of the fruit when sun-exposed. Both the fruit and flowers have excellent resistance to anthracnose and will fruit well even in marginal interior areas. 

The major drawback of the tree is its lack of precocity: Maha Chanoks usually take a while to start producing fruit, frustratingly longer than other varieties (likely a trait inherited from ‘Ivory’). Once they start bearing though they are strong producers. 


The trees have a medium growth habit and spreading canopy. They generally grow slowly at first, but their pace of growth picks up after a few years and they have long internodes, so they are not “dwarf” trees by any means. Maha Chanok is an early/mid-season mango in Florida, ripening from late-June through July most years. 

The name is sometimes spelled “Maha Chanook” or “Maha Shanook”.

Mahmood Vikarabad

This is a very old Nizam-era mango from India, where there are still some plantings of it in existence in Telangana state. The name is sometimes spelled “Mahmoods Vikarabad” or “Mahmooda Vikarabad”. We know little else about it other than that the eating quality is reportedly outstanding and its considered a dwarf tree. 

We obtained one in 2017.

Malda

This mango is from India, and is speculated to be descended from ‘Langra’ despite not resembling it in shape or flavor. It is highly regarded in Malda district of West Bengal, for which it is named. 

We obtained a small tree in 2017.

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Malindi

Malindi is from Kenya. It is reportedly a round, colorful mango that is somewhat fibrous. We know little else about it but planted one in 2017.

Mallika

The Mallika mango was a hybrid from India’s national mango breeding program, the result of a cross between Neelam and Dasheri. It was selected for its productivity, disease resistance and excellent eating quality. It was introduced to Florida where it has been promoted in the past by Fairchild Garden’s Mango Festival as a good variety for backyard growers. It has had mixed reception though due to the difficulty many have in determining when to harvest the fruit.


The fruit are oval-oblong, somewhat flattened. They will turn a light yellow color as they ripen, with zero red blush. The flesh is firm but fiberless, and when ripened properly has a delicious citrusy orange flavor with honey notes, similar to its parent Dasheri. Unfortunately, when Mallika is harvested too green, as it often is, the flavor is carrot-like, meally and unimpressive. Tree ripened fruit can take on a soured and unpleasant component as well. Picking Mallika requires some trial and error, but properly harvested Mallikas will generally take about a full week to really ripen properly. 


The trees are moderately vigorous growers with spreading, dense canopy. The fruit is a mid-season mango in south Florida ripening primarily in July. Our Mallika in West Palm Beach has been something of an alternate bearer. On the positive side, we had a Mallika in Loxahatchee that fruited without issue, a testament to its respectable anthracnose resistance. In 2018 we discovered Mallika is highly prone to bacterial black spot and lost most of the fruit to it, calling into question its future.


Manga Blanca

This mango is from Cuba, and is often grown from seed because it is polymebryonic. The fruit are round and small, yellow when ripe and have a very fibrous flesh with a mild flavor. 

We planted ours in 2017. It fruited in 2018 and the quality was so poor and fruit so obviously prone to bacterial spot that we immediately decided to topwork it to something else.

Manga Blanca (Stringless)

As it sounds, this is a supposedly fiberless version of Manga Blanca.

We planted it in 2017.

Mangifera Casturi

Not technically a mango (Mangifera indica), Mangifera casturi (or Kastoree) is a mango relative originally from Borneo, Indonesia that is a very small, round-oval fruit which turns purple is color. 

We have two types of Casturi trees in the ground in West Palm Beach and did manage to fruit one in Loxahatchee Groves at one point. 


The fruit are fibrous, light in flavor which some compare to lychee. The flowers and fruit are completely resistant to anthracnose, but the flowers can get powdery mildew.


Mangifera Lalijiwa

Lalijiwa is a mango relative native to Indonesia that produces medium sized oval green fruit that have a fiber-free flesh with a mild sweet flavor similar to that of many southeast asian mangos. 

They are resistant to anthracnose. 

We planted Lalijiwa in 2017

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Mangifera Odorata

Sometimes known as ‘Kuini’, Ordorata is a mango relative native to southeast Asia. The fruit tend to be small, oval shaped and green skinned with an orange flesh, and are known for having a very strong fragrance. Like the other mango relatives they appear highly anthracnose resistant.

We had our Odorata tree growing in Loxahatchee for some time where it struggled to grow; we brought it to West Palm Beach and planted it in 2017.

Manzanillo

Originally known as ‘Manzanillo-Nuñez’, this mango is from Manzanillo, Colima state, Mexico, where it was first observed in 1972. Later it was introduced to both Florida and Hawaii, where it has become more common. It is thought to be a Kent seedling, and the shape and color is similar. 


The fruit are round, medium-to-large in size, and turn a beautiful red rose color at maturity. The flesh is fiberless, with a mild classic group flavor and a small monoembryonic seed. 


The trees are only of medium vigour and have a vertical growth habit. They are a mid-season variety in Florida, but mature earlier than Kent, from late-June through July. Manzanillo has produced well here but has proven unacceptably susceptible to rot diseases and is being topworked.


Mario

We obtained this mango by mistake from a nursery, and its origins are unclear but we speculate that it may have ‘Glenn’ in its parentage. It is a small oddly shaped fruit, similar in shape to ‘Martin’ with a pot-bellied appearance. The skin is a solid yellow at maturity, the flesh a light orange color and fiberless, containing a monoembryonic seed. The flavor is in the classic group with dried apricot notes, and bears some similarities to Glenn though perhaps sweeter. The tree has a spreading growth habit with long wavy leaves that resemble Glenn as well. 


The tree flowers easily, and the primary season is from May to June, though we have had April fruit from it twice. Unfortunately Mario has proven to be highly susceptible to bacterial black spot of the fruit, calling into question whether we'll continue to grow it.

Marlys

This mango is from the breeding program of Gary Zill in Boynton Beach, FL and was a seedling of Zill-80 (planting # DW-10). It was named after Marlys Zill, sister of Gary and daughter of Laurence Zill. 



The fruit are round, medium-sized and shaped and red-skin colored similarly to ‘Haden’, with yellow fiberless flesh. It has a classic Florida mango flavor that we find similar to ‘Kent’, with notes of stone fruit.



The tree has a spreading and moderately vigorous growth habit. It sets fruit well but has struggled to flower in the last few warm winters we’ve had. It ripens mid-season here, primarily in July. We are evaluating ‘Marlys’ for its resistance to bacterial spot and rot.


Martin

This mango was from the property of D.H. Martin in West Palm Beach, FL. Its parentage went unreported, but a 2005 USDA genetic pedigree analysis estimated that Mulgoba was one of its parents.


 The fruit is medium-to-large in size, and has sometimes been called the ‘Pot Belly mango’ due to its unusual bulging shape. The flesh is in the classic flavor group, yellow and mild/insipid, containing a monoembryonic seed. 


The trees have a spreading, vigorous growth habit. We have found the fruit to be highly prone to Neofusicoccum rot disease, and have topworked our tree into Shamsul Asamar, Tong Dam and Shew Ya Za Ma.

Maya

Maya is from Israel, and is probably one of the better Israeli mangos. It is a round fruit shaped similarly to Haden, with beautiful red blush and yellow background color. The flesh is yellow, fiberless, with classic mango flavor and medium sweetness.


The trees are good producers, but also highly anthracnose prone. They have a vigorous, spreading growth habit with open canopy. 

The fruit mature from June to July in Florida.

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Mekong

This mango came from the breeding program of David Sturrock in West Palm Beach, FL and was a cross between an Edward and a Philippine mango. It was named ‘Mekong’ due to its resemblance to ‘Mango Mecongensis’, to which it has no relation.  

We have the original tree (and possibly only) on site. The fruit are kidney shaped, yellow, and medium sized. The flesh is firm yet fiberless, orange in color and has a rather unique flavor that is like a Thai mango with a resinous component. It contains a polyembryonic seed. Some of our customers really enjoy this fruit’s unusual profile. It has been a relatively steady producer and the fruit are very anthracnose resistant too. 


Mekong is a mid-season mango usually ripening from late June through July.


Merritt Island Saigon

This mango is presumably from Merritt Island, FL and derived from a Saigon-type mango, but we know little else about it. We obtained a tree in 2017.

Mesk

Mesk is from Egypt. It is a small oval fruit that develops nice purple/red color as it matures. The flesh is orange, fiberless, and rich with a good deal of spice notes to go along with a tropical fruit punch flavor. The tree is a vigorous grower with vertical growth habit, and seems to produce well while possessing good disease resistance. The fruit have a short shelf life however, and they tend to turn soft while still on the tree. They ripen well when harvested mature firm. It is a mid-season mango that ripens from late June through July

Mulgoba

The Mugoba was sent to Florida from India in 1889 as part of a project to introduce a number of Indian cultivars to the US. The mystery of Mulgoba is that the fruit do not resemble the ‘Mulgoa’ (without the ‘b’) of India, leading to speculation that the original tree sent was killed below the graft union in a hard freeze in 1895. We tend to believe this as the likely explanation, as the original tree did not fruit until 1898. It was grown near modern West Palm Beach under the care of Profesor Elbridge Gale for many years. After it began fruiting, it was recognized for its outstanding eating quality, and was propagated by nurseryman in south Florida. It also became the maternal parent of the Haden mango, which was a seedling from Mulgoba. Thus most Florida mangos can trace their decendence to the Mulgoba.


The fruit is ovate in shape, small-to-medium sized, and develops purplish-red blush with bright yellow background color on the skin. The pale-yellow flesh is very soft, fiberless, and quite rich and sweet with plenty of spice notes and just a hint of ‘coconut’. The seed is monoembryonic. 


The fruit are unfortunately very prone to internal breakdown, especially if allowed to ripen on the tree. The trees themselves are vigorous growers with dense, spreading canopy. They are very fungal prone, often failing to fruit in interior areas and only suited for regions close to the coast. 


The trees also have trouble blooming well in Florida’s climate, and require a strong cold stimulus. Because of these issues, Mulgoba tends to produce very poorly here. It is a mid-season mango maturing mostly in July.

Myatrynat

This mango is from Myanmar, where it is grown on some commercial scale. We planted ours in 2015 and it has grown rather slowly. 

Nam Doc Mai #4

From Thailand, Nam Doc Mai #4 is one of numerous iterations of Nam Doc Mai. The #4 tends to be a compact and precocious tree. The fruit are sigmoid-oblong with a tapering nose, turning a dull green-sih yellow at maturity. The flesh is pale yellow, silky smooth and completely fiberless. It has a strong floral and honey component, lacking any tartness. It contains a thin, long polyembryonic seed. It is the quintessential Thai mango.


The fruit are early season ripening from May to July most years. The flowers and foliage have good anthracnose resistance, but the fruit itself is susceptible to post-harvest anthracnose and the flowers are highly prone to powdery mildew. The fruit also like to split open on the tree more than the other versions of Nam Doc Mai. They tend to fruit well in deep interior areas with high humidity, but are moderately prove to rot fungi.

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Nam Doc Mai Mun

This Nam Doc Mai-type has been speculated to be a cross between Nam Doc Mai and Keow Savoy. We aren’t sure if this is correct or not, but the fruit has the appearance of a “small” Nam Doc Mai with the same flavor. 


The tree has a very spreading growth habit. After meandering for several years it finally fruited well in 2018.

Nam Doc Mai Sia Tong

This mango is sometimes referred to as the ‘Golden Nam Doc Mai’. Unlike most Nam Doc Mais, Sia Tong’s fruit turns a bright yellow ‘golden’ color at maturity. 


The fruit are medium-sized, with the classic sigmoid-tapering shape associated with Nam Doc Mai. The flesh is light yellow, silky smooth and  has the same flavor, with honeyed floral sweetness lacking any tartness or acid component. The seed is long, thin, and  polyembryonic. Sia Tong trees are not as precociou as Nam Doc Mai #4, and tend to be more vigorous growers. However, their production is good, and Sia Tong fruit tend to split open less than the other versions of Nam Doc Mai. Sia Tong has good disease resistance and fruited well in Loxahatchee Groves under high disease pressure.

Nam Tam Teem

This mango is from Thailand and is oblong/kidney shaped, turning a greenish-yellow at maturity. Sometimes it is spelled ‘Nam Tam Teen’. 

We obtained a tree in 2017.

Nancy

This mango was a seedling of Keitt from the breeding program of Gary Zill in Boynton Beach, FL and ripens late-season. 

We planted it in 2017 for evaluation.

Naomi

Naomi is from Israel, and was a seedling of Palmer planted in 1976. The flesh is yellow, fiberless, and has a mild, classic flavor. The seed is monoembryonic. 


The fruit are medium sized, oval-oblong in shape, and turn a beautiful red color at maturity. Naomi is a mid-season mango in Florida maturing largely in July

Neelum

Sometimes spelled Neelam, this mango is from south India where it is grown on commercial scale. It is a very late-season mango, generally maturing from August to September, with some fruit lasting into October certain years. The fruit are small, oval-ovate in shape, and turn yellow along the coast, tending to stay green when ripe in the interior areas. The flesh is fiberless, pale yellow, and has a light resiny flavor. The seed is monoembryonic. The trees have a low spreading growth habit, and the leaves are long, thin and distinctive. The trees are very manageable and can be kept small with relative ease. The flowers and fruit are very  fungus resistant, so much so that Neelum fruited successfully for us in Loxahatchee without any spraying. 

N - O

Nele Petite

Sometimes this mango is spelled as one word (Nelepetite). It is a small oblong shaped fruit that turns a crimson red color. We obtained a tree in 2017.


Nelson

This mango is from Jamaica. Reportedly the eating quality is superb and flesh fiberless. We don’t know much else about it but planted one in 2017 for evaluation. 

Okrung

Okrung (also spelled ‘Okrong’) is from Thailand, and is probably one of the sweetest mangos in the world. It is a small oblong fruit that stays largely green at maturity with a tiny hint of red blush and yellow. The flesh is pale yellow, has some fiber, with a rather poor flesh-to-seed ratio. The flavor is sugar cane sweetness, with no acidity to balance it out. 


The trees are moderately vigorous with vertical growth habits. They are very un-precocious, often taking years to first flower. They do fruit well when they bloom though. Okrung is a mid-season mango maturing late-June through July. Okrung has good anthracnose resistance and will fruit in the interior, but it appears at least moderately-to-very susceptible to mango bacterial black spot and rot fungi.

Okrung Tong

This mango is from Thailand (sometimes spelled Okrong) and is similar to traditional Okrung but produces a larger fruit with slightly less fiber. 

We suspect that the tree we have labelled as ‘Okrung Tong’ is actually just a regular Okrung though.

Orange Essence

Orange Essence is an excellent new mango from the breeding program of Gary Zill of Boynton Beach, FL (planting # 40-33). It was a seedling of Kent that may have had Gary as its pollen parent. 


The fruit are roundly shaped like Kent, medium sized and turn yellow at maturity. The flesh is fiberless and has a wonderfully and intensely rich citrus flavor with terrific sweetness. It appears to be a mid-season mango ripening from July to August. 

We planted several Orange Essence trees in 2017 for evaluation.

Orange Sherbet

This mango is from the breeding program of Gary Zill of Boynton Beach, FL (planting # G-32). It was a seedling of Lemon Meringue, making it a sibling of the Lemon Zest mango. It has an oval-oblong shape, turning yellow at maturity with an orange fiberless flesh. The flavor is incredibly rich and sweet with a strong, complex orange-citrus candy flavor. The seed is polyembryonic. 


The trees appear to be moderately vigorous growers and good producers. However we are evaluating its resistance to bacterial black spot, to which it has some degree of susceptibility. 

We top-worked a tree into Orange Sherbert in 2017. 

O - P

Oro

Oro is from Mexico (the name means ‘Gold’ in Spanish) and probably a seedling of mixed parentage. 


The fruit are oval-oblong and turn bright purple/red in color even before maturity. In Mexico it is reportedly used for green consumption. The ripe fruit has a yellow, very fibrous flesh with mild, insipid flavor. The season is early from June to July and the trees are productive. 

We found Oro to be highly susceptible to bacterial black spot and rot fungi and this problem, coupled with mediocre ripe flavor, have driven us to  topwork it into a Cac.

Osteen

Osteen is from Merritt Island, FL and was named after S.A. Posteen on whose property the seed was planted in 1935 and fruited in 1940. It is believed to have been a seedling of Haden. 


The fruit are oval-oblong, medium-to-large in size with a raised stem end, and turn a purple color well before maturity that changes to a beautiful bright red when the fruit ripens. The flesh is yellow, with only minimal fiber, and possesses a very nice medium-bodied classic flavor. The seed is monoembryonic. 


The trees are medium growers with spreading canopy. Osteen is a heavy producer and has become adapted commercially overseas, including Spain. Plantings still exist on Merritt Island as well. It is a late season mango and we obtained a few trees in 2017 for evaluation. 

Palmer

Palmer was likely a Haden seedling selected in Miami, FL, planted around 1925. It was recognized for its heavy production, beautiful color and relatively late season for the time. Commercial propagation began in the 1940s and Palmer received plantings in south Florida groves. Later it was introduced overseas where it is grown commercially and was utilized in the Israeli mango breeding program.


The fruit are medium-to-large in size, oval shaped and turn purple well before reaching maturity, sometimes leading to premature harvest. When the fruit ripen they turn red with yellow background color. The flesh is yellow, firm with minimal-to-no fiber. The flavor is mild, in the classic group, and can get washed out under wet conditions. 


The trees have a moderately vigorous, spreading growth habit with open canopy. They are heavy producers with good resistance to anthracnose, usually ripening from July to August. Unfortunately Palmer has severe problems with Neofusicoccum rot and we do not recommend its planting. In 2018 we cut our Palmer back to a stump to be topworked.

Panchadara Kalassa

This mango is from India, where it is known as a juice mango. It may also be spelled ‘Panchadara Kalasu’. The flesh is fiberless and extremely juice with a rich-sweet Indian spice flavor. Reportedly it can produce well in Florida. 

We planted one in 2016 and are waiting for it to fruit. 

Peach

This mango may be synonymous with ‘Stringless Peach’, though it isn’t truly “stringless”, containing a small amount of fiber. It may have originated in the Homestead area in the early 20th century and was probably derived from a turpentine-type mango. 


Peach became one of the more common mangos in south Florida for several decades, possibly because it could be grown from seed due to being  polyembryonic.  The fruit are small, round shaped and turn yellow when ripe. The flesh is yellow with a moderately sweet peachy-classic flavor. 


The trees are moderately vigorous growers with spreading habit. They are good producers though the fruit are too small for commercial utilization. They are early season, ripening from May to July in south Florida.


Peach Cobbler

Peach Cobbler is an interesting mango from the breeding program of Gary Zill in Boynton Beach, FL (planting # O-2), and was a Kent seedling with ‘Gary’ thought to be its pollen parent. 



The fruit are round in shape, small-to-medium sized, and stay mostly light green even when ripe, making judging maturity challenging. The flesh is soft, fiberless, and orange in color. The flavor is exceptionally rich, but despite the name, has more of a complex citrus flavor and has been extremely popular among those who try it. Unfortunately, the fruit will go overripe if allowed to ripen on the tree and the shelf life seems rather brief.



The tree is a vigorous growth with dense, spreading canopy. They appear to be highly un-precocious, taking years just to flower and have flowered poorly in response to mild winters. Their fruit set has been average and retention unimpressive. The season is July to August. Due to its issues so far, we can’t recommend Peach Cobbler to home growers at this time despite its superb flavor.

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Pettigrew

Pettigrew was selected in Palma Sola, Bradenton, FL and was likely a seedling of ‘Mulgoba’. It was promoted by Asa Pillsbury, and sent to Laurence Zill, who took some interest in its due to its unique flavor. 


The fruit are medium sized, oval shaped often with a raised ventral shoulder, and tend to be greenish-yellow at maturity, solid green when grown inland. The flesh is pale colored, firm, fiberless, and, when properly ripened, has an exquisite coconut flavor with citrus back notes. The seed is monoembryonic.  Unfortunately Pettigrew has a strong tendency towards uneven ripening for many; we have had excellent fruit from ours and nasty, rancid tasting ones as well. The fruit has good anthracnose resistance, but the trees produce too many male flowers and consequently have a reputation for being shy bearers. The growth habit is low, spreading, with very thin distinctive leaves that resemble peach tree foliage.

Pettigrew is a mid-season variety ripening from July to August.

Philippine (Carabao)

Philippine was probably introduced to the US shortly after 1900 by way of Cuba, where it was commonly grown from seed due to being polyembryonic. The iteration grown here in Florida is the Carabao-type, the most popular mango in the Philippines, where it is grown on wide commercial scale.


The fruit are sigmoid-oblong, small, turning a solid yellow when ripe. The flesh is fiberless, soft, with a nice tropical-sweet Indochinese/Saigon type flavor, though the fruit often get over-looked due to their size. The fruit have excellent anthracnose resistance and have good resistance to bacterial spot and rot as well.


The trees are vigorous, vertical growers and highly un-precocious, taking a while to bloom for the first time. They also have an earned reputation for being alternate bearers, often fruiting well one year and poorly or not at all the next. Philippine is an early season mango ripening from May-to-July. 

Phoenix

Phoenix is a well regarded selection from the breeding program of Gary Zill of Boynton Beach, FL, and was a ‘Dot’ seedling (planting # C-26). 


The tree was so named after the mythological Phoenix because it was cut back for removal but came back and fruited. The trees appear to be vigorous growers. 

We planted several in 2017 and have a few grafted to Gary Zill’s experimental dwarfing rootstocks as well. 

Pickering

Pickering was a random seedling selected by Walter Zill of Boynton Beach, FL in the 1980s, and is speculated to be a cross between Carrie and Irwin. It was named after Wayne Pickering, a customer of Walter’s.


The fruit are oblong-oval in shape, medium-sized, turning light-yellow at maturity with light pink blush and pink ‘splotching’ on the skin. The flesh is yellow, very firm, with a minimal amount of fiber. The flavor at peak ripeness is extremely sweet with many tasting coconut undertones. The seed is monoembryonic. Often it is cut too early resulting in only mild classic flavor; Pickering requires patience for its peak flavor. 


The trees have a distinctive dwarf growth habit and are very easy to control. They are precocious fruiters, and highly anthracnose resistant at the floral and fruit setting stages, though the fruit themselves may be uglied by post-harvest anthracnose. Pickering fruited well for us year-after-year even in fungal-infested Loxahatchee, FL without spraying. They also have good resistance to powdery mildew, bacterial spot and rot fungi. 


We love Pickering for all its wonderful traits and often recommend it to customers as a dooryard tree as well! Some people even grow them in pots. They ripen early season from June to July. 

Pim Sen Mun

This mango is from Thailand and is commonly consumed mature-green like a crunchy apple. The fruit are small-to-medium sized, yellow when ripe, and have an oblong-sigmoid shape. The medium-firm flesh is yellow, with some fiber, and is very sweet when ripe, having typical Thai mango floral and honey character and lacking in acidity. The seed is polyembryonic. The trees are moderately vigorous growers with spreading, dense canopy. Pim Sen Mun is early season, ripening from May through June here

Piña Colada

Pina Colada is an outstanding selection from the breeding program of Gary Zill in Boynton Beach, FL (planting # 40-14). Its maternal parent was ‘Dot’ and ‘Gary’ was its paternal parent. 


The fruit tend to be quite small, less than 8 ounces in many instances. The have an ovate shape with tapered bottom similar to that of the ‘Fairchild’, and turn a light yellow when ripe. The flesh is light yellow, soft, and fiberless, containing a polyembryonic seed. The flavor of Piña Colada is rich as syrup at the regular ripe stage, like a ‘Dot’ mango on steroids. At the riper stage, its namesake enters the flavor profile and it takes on those remarkable pineapple and coconut notes found in the frozen drink. Almost sickenly sweet, it is not a mango for the faint of heart! 


The trees are slow growers with spreading, open canopy. Unfortunately they are highly anthracnose prone and tend to produce too many male flowers. For these reasons, we do not recommend them for the deep interior. 


Piña Colada is a mango best suited to be grown in close proximity to the ocean, where you might also enjoy one at the beach under the tropical sun. It is a mid-season mango ripening from July to August.

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Pineapple Pleasure

This amazingly-flavored mango is from the breeding program of Gary Zill of Boynton Beach, FL (planting # 23-21). Its maternal parent was ‘Springfels’ and paternal parent ‘Gary’. 


The fruit are medium-to-large in size, ovoid with a rather ugly bumpy skin, turning a light yellowish green color at maturity with a small amount of red blush when grown close to the coast. The flesh is light-yellow, medium-firm, and fiberless. The flavor is nothing short of awesome, with tremendous pineapple notes and acidity coupled with very high degree of sweetness. We have measured Pineapple Pleasure fruits with brix ratings in the mid-20s, a testament to how sweet it can get. The fruit have good shelf life as well.


The trees are slow-to-medium vigor growers, with spreading habit and open canopy. Unfortunately the trees are terrible producers when grown more than a few miles from the coast, often failing to fruit entirely due to anthracnose and powdery mildew susceptibility. At our location in West Palm Beach, however, Pineapple Pleasure has given us a glimpse of hope that it can fruit at an acceptable level provided the trees close to the ocean and are well cared for.  It is a mid-season variety, fruiting primarily in July.

Piva

Piva is from South Africa, where it has been used as a rootstock that is capable of dwarfing some cultivars, including a number of Florida-types. It is a red-colored fruit, small-to-medium in size, and produces beautiful inflorescence. The flavor is in the classic group and fairly mild with some earthiness. 

Prieto

This mango is from Cuba, and the name means “black”. The fruit are small, ovate, and stay green when ripe. The flesh is orange, quite fibrous, with a mild classic-group flavor. The seed is polyembryonic. Prieto trees grow slowly, and are very manageable. 

We planted one in 2017 for evaluation.

Providence

This mango was chance seedling, thought to be from ‘Kent’, selected by Walter Zill of Boynton Beach, FL. 


The fruit are medium-to-large in size (typically over a pound), round in shape like Kent, developing a gorgeous red skin color with yellow-green background at maturity. The flesh is firm, fiberless, and yellow. The flavor is in the classic-acidic group, reminiscent of Kent but superior, with a more complexity and defined tart component. The seed is monoembryonic. 


The trees are also less vigorous and more compact than Kent, with a slightly more spreading habit and open canopy. Unfortunately they appear to be more average producers. Of greater concern to us is Providence’s potential susceptibility to the new bacterial spot and rot diseases due to its Kent genes. We have several trees and are evaluating them for disease resistance and long-term productivity. Providence is a mid-late season mango ripening from July to August.


R8T3

We obtained this mango from the USDA in Miami, FL in 2018 and don’t really know anything about it. Presumably the designation stands for “Row 8, Tree 3”. 

Rapoza

Rapoza is from Hawaii, and was selected as a seedling of ‘Irwin’ by Richard Hamilton of the University of Hawaii in Poamoho in the 1985 and named after Herbert Rapoza. It has been planted on some commercial scale in Hawaii due to its positive traits. In Florida, it is sometimes mis-identified as ‘Dwarf Hawaiian’ (the ‘real’ Dwarf Hawaiian is also known as ‘Tete Nene’, which we grow).


The fruit are known for their beautiful crimson red skin with yellow background color, are round in shape, medium-sized, with yellow, firm and fiberless flesh. The seed is monoembryonic. The flavor is in the classic group, light/medium-bodied with notes of stone fruit. 


The trees are moderately vigorous growers with spreading dense canopy, and are very good producers, with moderate-resistance to anthracnose and powdery mildew. They would make good backyard mango trees in south Florida, but we are concerned about its susceptibility to the new diseases and are evaluating it for now. Rapoza is a mid-season variety in Florida generally ripening from July to August.

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Rataul

We originally believed this mango to be synonymous with ‘Anwar Ratol’ of Pakistan/north India. However, we now believe this to be a different cultivar and of no clear relation. It is contained in both the collections of the USDA and Miami-Dade Fruit and Spice Park, and produces an oblong, yellow colored mango possibly of southeast Asian origin. So if you are seeking Anwar Ratal, this is NOT it. We planted a ‘Rataul’ in 2017 for evaluation anyways.


Rosa

Rosa is from Brazil, where it grown on considerable commercial scale and pronounced ‘HO-sa’. It has drawn some attention for being one of the earliest maturing varieties in Florida, typically having at least some spring-time fruit. 


The trees are very sensitive to changes in weather patterns and flower very easily as a result.

It is an ovate shaped fruit developing a pretty pink-red blush well before ripening. The flesh is very firm, fibrous, and yellow. The seed is polyembryonic. Rosa’s flavor and aroma are strong, resinous and loaded with turpenes with moderate sweetness. The trees have been slow growers for us and highly manageable. They are very anthracnose-prone however and probably not suitable for the interior, being more appropriately grown within a few miles of the ocean. The fruit also appear to be at least partially susceptible to Neofusicoccum rotting fungi, so we are evaluating the impact on its yield. 

Rosa normally has two crops, one from March to April and a second from June to July. 

Rosigold

Rosigold was selected in south Florida and has received considerable attention in the mango world due to its promotion by Fairchild Tropical Garden and their fruit program over the years. A 2005 USDA pedigree analysis indicated that ‘Ono’ was Rosigold’s likely parent and there is some physical resemblance between the two fruit. Rosigold is one of our earliest fruiting varieties thanks to its prolific flowering habit, almost always having their first ripe fruits during the spring months for us.


The fruit are oblong in shape, turning yellow at maturity with nice light red/pink blush covering about half the fruit when sun-exposed. The flesh is yellow, moderately firm, and completely fiberless, coming clean off the seed. The seed itself is polyembryonic. The flavor is in the mild classic group, with delightful stone fruit and peach notes. The later-maturing Rosigolds are typically superior to the earliest fruit to ripen, but a March Rosigold is king when no other mangos are around!


The trees are slow growers with spreading growth habit and moderately dense canopy. They are super easy to manage and make wonderful choices for backyard growers with minimal space. The flowers and small fruit are very anthracnose prone however, so Rosigold isn’t a good choice for high-humid areas. Its early blooms in particular are most prone to anthracnose. They ultra-early season and typically have two crops, with one occurring from March to April and a second from May to July.

Ruby

This mango was selected in 1948 by Ed. P Davis, a mango grower in Miami, FL. It was most likely a seedling of ‘Haden’ as were many selections made during this time period. ( It should *not* be confused with “Fairchild Ruby”, a name conferred on the Zill J-12 which is a different variety) As the name suggests, the Ruby fruit have eye-catching color, turning a bright red with some yellow background color. Sometimes they can be solid red. They have an oval-ovate shape and are usually kind of small, always weighing less than a pound. The flesh is medium-firm, yellow, with scanty fiber, containing a monoembryonic seed. The flavor is squarely in the mild-classic Florida group, comparable to the like of Haden and Irwin. 

The trees are low-medium growers, with spreading canopy. They possess decent anthracnose resistance and even fruited in Loxahatchee Groves for us. Ruby is a mid-season variety in south Florida and ripens from late-June into July most years.


Rumani

Rumani is from south India, and is grown on considerable commercial scale there. The fruit have a distinctive round/globular shape like an apple, and look similar to the Florida ‘Cushman’ cultivar. They are small-to-medium sized. 


The fruit turn a solid yellow when ripe, with firm, light yellow-colored fiberless flesh containing a small monoembryonic seed. The flavor is very rich and sweet, in the classic flavor group and very enjoyable, somewhat comparable to ‘Edward’. 


The trees have a spreading, compact growth habit with dense canopy. Some may regard it as ‘dwarfish’, though it is a little too vigorous for that characterization. The tree flowers well, producing a solid white inflorescence and tending to set fruit on the distillate ends of its panicles. In India it is a heavy bearer and regarded as a ‘later’ mango but in Florida it is more mid-season, ripening in July for us. We’re still evaluating its production but results thus far have been encouraging. 

Ryan

This mango is reportedly from Miami, FL. We planted one in 2015 but its has grown slowly and has yet to fruit.

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Sabre

Sabre is from South Africa, and is used as a rootstock there and in other countries as well. It is apparently capable of dwarfing some cultivars while making others more vigorous. The fruit are small-to-medium sized, oblong in shape with attractive pink colored skin. The flesh is very fibrous and flavor rather objective and unappealing. 

We obtained one in 2017 for evaluation as a source of rootstock. Sabre is an early season mango in Florida.

Saigon

Saigon is a name that was applied to a shipment of seeds sent to Florida from then-French Indochina by David Fairchild in 1902. 


The ‘Saigon’ we have was obtained from Fairchild Farm from a tree grafted off of what was considered David Fairchild’s “original” Saigon.


This tree makes medium-to-large oblong shaped fruit that turn a light greenish-yellow color at maturity. The flesh is yellow, fiberless, with an Indochinese-hybrid class flavor. Other versions of Saigon grown from seed have seen some degree of variation, with some developing pink or red blush and smaller fruit of varying shape. Because it is polyembryonic, many Saigon trees in the early 20th century were grown from seed. 

Fairchild’s original Saigon is dwarfish in growth habit and very precocious, and fruits well in Homestead, FL. We planted a small grafted tree in 2017 for evaluation and look forward to trialing it here.

San Felipe

This mango is from Cuba, but most Cubans have never heard of it. It was probably a seedling of Haden or Kent, and has received some publication largely due to its promotion as a ‘Curator’s Choice’ cultivar by Fairchild Garden for their mango festival several years . It is a medium-to-large, round shaped fruit developing beautiful red skin blush with some yellow background color appearing as it ripens. The flesh is very firm, fiberless, and contains a small monoembryonic seed. The flavor is very mild, in the classic group. The fruit seem to have a prolonged shelf-life.


The trees are vigorous growers, with open canopy and somewhat vertical growth habit. They flower well and tend to bunch-set fruit on the distillate ends of their panicles. Anthracnose resistance is poor in the interior and it struggled to fruit in Loxahatchee for us, but fruits well in West Palm Beach. San Felipe is a mid-season mango in south Florida, ripening from late June through Jul

Seacrest

Seacrest was an ‘Edward’ seedling from the breeding program of Gary Zill in Boynton Beach, FL (planting # 40-36), with ‘Gary’ as its likely pollen parent. It was named after Seacrest Blvd, a road running between the communities of Lantana and Delray Beach. 


The fruit are medium sized, yellow at maturity, with fiberless flesh of *outstandingly* rich and sweet flavor with some spice character. We are excited about this mango’s potential and have planted several of them for evaluation purposes. 


The trees look to be very vigorous growers and have produced well for Gary and Walter Zill. Seacrest appears to be a mid-season cultivar in Florida.

Sein Ta Lone

This mango is from Myanmar, and is grown on commercial scale in that country for export to other parts of Asia. Also known as the ‘Diamond Solitaire’ or simply ‘Diamond’ mango (*NOT* to be confused with the Zill ‘Diamond’, aka HW-14, to which it bears no relation) It is considered to be of excellent eating quality and a good producer. 

We planted a tree in 2017 for evaluation.

Shamsul Asamar

This mango is from India, and regarded as a rare Nizam-era variety and possibly an endangered cultivar. The eating quality is regarded as outstanding and some efforts have been made to keep it around in India despite other varieties receiving far more plantings. 

We topworked our a tree into Shamsul Asamar in 2017 and look forward to evaluating it.

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Shwehintha

Shwehintha is from Myanmar and the spelling can vary. It is a long, oblong shaped yellow fruit. The flesh is fiberless, yellow, containing a long thin polymebryonic seed. The eating quality is excellent, comparable to the Maha Chanok in quality. 

Production appears good on trees we’ve seen but there are reports that it is somewhat fungus prone in more humid areas. We planted one in 2016 and look forward to trialing it here.

Simmonds

This mango was a cross between Haden and Phillipine from a hybrid project conducted by Edward Simmonds in Miami, FL during the 1920s. Simmonds had sought to cross Indian-descended mangos with southeast Asian cultivars to produce something that combined their respective eating qualities, but possessed the fungal resistance of the southeast Asian mangos. This particular mango was given the name ‘Simmonds’ by David Sturrock, who rescued the budwood after Simmonds death in the 1930s and grafted and described it. 


The fruit are ovately shaped, yellow developing some red/pink tint with good sun exposure. The flesh is yellow, firm, fiberless, and contains a small polyembryonic seed. The fruit has good eating quality with some character from the Philippine-Carabao, with some acid notes from the classic flavor group. It is highly resistant to anthracnose and flowers and sets fruit prolifically. Unfortunately, we have found Simmonds fruit to be highly prone to Neofusicoccum and Phomopsis rotting fungi and have lost large percentages of its crops to these diseases over the last several years. Simmonds never received widespread propagation unlike its sibling the Edward, and few of the trees remain in south Florida. 


We have a very old specimen that was planted on the day of the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, along with a smaller tree planted a few years ago. The old tree was back to a stump at the end of the 2018 season. Simmonds is a mid-season cultivar ripening from late June through July.

Sindhri

Sometimes spelled differently (Shindri, Sindiri, etc), this mango is thought to be from Pakistan, where it is very popular. It is also grown on some scale in northern India as well. It is an oblong-shaped yellow mango and the eating quality is supposedly excellent. 


We obtained a tree a number of years ago and it has grown very slowly, without flowering yet. We are optimistic it can fruit here based off of reports from the USDA and hope that it can do so when its larger in future seasons.

Sindhu

Sindhu was a project of India’s national breeding program, a cross between ‘Ratna’ and ‘Alphonso’ and has been in existence for several decades. It gained a false reputation for producing ‘seedless’ fruit, when in reality the fruit just have small, undeveloped seeds. 

The fruit are considered small and of superb eating quality. We obtained a tree in 2015 and planted it in 2017 for evaluation here.

Si Siam

This mango is presumably from Thailand, though there is no literature supporting this. We obtained our tree from a nursery in southwest Florida and evidently there is a tree  under this label at the Miami-Dade Fruit and Spice Park, though it’s unclear if they are the same variety. At any rate, the fruit are oblong in shape, develop light red/pink color and bear some resemblance to the Maha Chanok mango, but with a fatter appearance and a regular Thai honey/floral flavor lacking any acid component

. Its a very productive tree and seems high anthracnose resistant. Its an early season fruit maturing from June to Jul

Smith (Hawaii)

This mango is from Hawaii, and we are not sure whether this is synonymous with ‘Smith-Haden’ or ‘Smith-Wooten’, which are distinct Hawaiian cultivars. It is a different variety from the Florida ‘Smith’ grown commercially in Bokeelia though. 

We planted our Hawaiian Smith in 2016 after obtaining a tree directly from Hawaii and it has flowered enthusiastically despite being too small to fruit the last two years. In 2018 it produced one mango of very nice eating quality. The flesh is orange, fiberless with a paper thin seed. Smith's flavor is in the classic group and comparable to mangos like Bailey's Marvel and Ah Ping. 

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Sonpari

Sometimes spelled as two names (Son Pari), this mango is from India and a product of its national breeding program in Paria, Gujarat state. It was a cross between the Banganpalli (aka Baneshan) and Alphonso varieties and is considered to possess excellent disease resistance, production, and physiological traits compared to its parents. It was introduced to Florida by nurseryman Gary Zill in the early 2000s and the trees have performed well here. 


The fruit are round-ovate in shape, medium sized and pale-yellow at maturity, sometimes developing a little pink blush at the top. The flesh is yellow, medium firm, fiberless, and contains a monoembryonic seed. The flavor it amazingly rich and complex with a terrific combination of decadent sweetness and spice notes, belonging to the Alphonso-Indian group and superior to both Banganpalli and Alphonso in our opinion.  One fruit brix tested in the 20s in 2017. 


The trees are medium-vigor growers with spreading canopy and appear manageable, with good anthracnose resistance. Sonpari is a mid-season mango in Florida maturing from late June through July.


Unfortunately In 2018 we determined Son Pari to be highly prone to mango bacterial black spot.

Sophie Fry

Sophie Fry was a seedling of Julie selected by the Zill family in Delray Beach, FL and named after Laurence Zill’s grandmother. It’s claim to fame is being the maternal parent of the ‘Carrie’ mango. Very few Sophie Fry trees are left in Florida. 

We grafted a one in 2016 and planted it in 2017 for evaluation.

Southern Blush

Southern Blush was probably a seedling of ‘Eldon’, selected by the Zill family in Boynton Beach, FL decades ago. The fruit are medium-to-large in size, round-oval in shape, developing beautiful light red blush over much of the sun exposed portion of the fruit. The flesh is firm, yellow, and has minimal fiber, containing a monoembryonic seed. The flavor is medium-bodied and belonging to the classic Florida group with light stone fruit elements.

The trees are moderately vigorous growers with spreading open canopy. 


The fruit ripen mid-season in Florida mostly from late-June through July. Southern Blush is highly prone to anthracnose and struggles with fungus in the interior. 

We have discovered it is highly susceptible to bacterial black spot and rot fungi, to such a high degree that we do *not* recommend its planting. In 2018, we cut our Southern Blush tree to a stump to be topworked.

Spirit of 76

This mango was a natural cross between Haden and Zill, selected by the Zill family in Boynton Beach, FL. It received its name because the tree first fruited during the US Bicentennial in 1976. 


The fruit is medium sized, oval in shape, and has beautiful red blush long before reaching maturity, at which point it develops some yellow background color. The flesh is yellow, fiberless, soft, and contains a monoembryonic seed. The flavor is very good, belonging to the classic group with some distinctive citrus notes to go along with peach and stone fruit flavors. In fact Spirit of 76 is one of the most widely enjoyed mangos by customers and we often receive positive feedback from people who try them. Unfortunately their shelf life is poor and they can go over-ripe fast. 


The trees are low-to-medium vigor growers, with somewhat vertical but trainable growth habit and open canopy. They are too anthracnose prone for the deep interior, but perform acceptably <10 miles inland. They are merely average producers however, and they have had some issues blooming in warmer winters. The fruit ripen from late June through July. 

Springfels

The Springfels mango was selected by Charles Springfels of West Palm Beach, FL. He attempted to hybridize the ‘Haden’ mango with the ‘Sandersha’ (aka Totapuri or Bangalora), and named one of the resulting seedlings the ‘Springfels Superior’, shortened to ‘Springfels’. The fruit are very large (typically weighing several pounds)  oval-oblong in shape, yellow at maturity with beautiful pink/red coloring on sun exposed portions. The flesh is soft, with medium fiber content, very juicy, containing a monoembryonic seed. The flavor is rich and sweet, in the classic-acidic group, and is very often likened to pineapple. 


The fruit are very prone to internal breakdown/uneven ripening and should be ripened off the tree to help prevent this. The trees are low-medium vigor growers with spreading habit. They tend to be highly productive near the coast, but struggle to fruit in the interior due to fungal problems. The fruit typically mature from July to August.


We have recently discovered that Springfels is highly prone to bacterial black spot and rot fungi, and do not recommend its planting. At the end of the 2018 season we cut our Springfels tree to a stump to be topworked.

Sunrise

Sunrise was a Jakarta seedling from the breeding program of Gary Zill in Boynton Beach, FL (planting # 25-28). The fruit are oval shaped, medium sized, and turn a yellow-orange color with green background at maturity. The flesh is yellow, fiberless, firm, and contains a monoembryonic seed. The flavor is very rich, resinous, and spice-noted, comparable to Bombay and Jakarta, very much belonging in the Indian/West Indian-flavor group. 


The trees are very vigorous growers with upright growth habit and dense canopy. They seem to have good anthracnose resistance and fruit well in Loxahatchee, possibly being a good alternative for people wanting to grow jakarta or Bombay under more humid conditions. However, Sunrise may have other disease problems according to reports, so it may no longer be grafted. Our tree has been disease free though and we have considered adding more Sunrise trees to our program. It is a mid-season mango in Florida ripening from late-June through July.

S

Sunset

There are two ‘Sunset’ mangos in Florida: one from Bokeelia, Pine Island that we called the ‘Frank Adams Sunset’, the other from Merritt Island which we do not yet have. The Frank Adams Sunset is estimated by pedigree analysis to have been a cross between Haden and Amini , and was described by the Florida Mango Forum  in the 1950s. It was planted at the Tropica Research Center in Homestead in the 1940s and has survived in the collection of Fairchild Garden. 


The fruit are small-to-medium sized, oval in shape, turning yellow-orange at maturity. They have a firm, fiberless yellow flesh with a monoembryonic seed. The flavor is of the classic group, rich and sweet with a hint of sweet melon.


The trees are moderately vigorous, upright growers and have a reputation for producing well. 


Our Sunset has grown rather slowly since planting and had its first crop in 2018. It is an early season variety in Florida, ripening from June to July.

Starch

Starch is from Trinidad, and is known for being a highly prolific producer of flavorful small, round shaped yellow mangos. They are considered anthracnose prone in Florida. 

We obtained a Starch tree a few years ago and planted it in 2017.

Step

This mango may be from Hawaii but we’re not sure. It is thought to be derived from Totapuri (aka Sandersha or Bangalora). There is a strong physical resemblance between the two, but Step has much better eating quality.

The fruit are medium-to-large in size, oblong shaped and stay relatively green with a hint of red blush when ripe. The flesh is firm, with minimal fiber, and has a pleasant mild Indian resin flavor.

Our Step tree has grown slowly since planting in 2014, fruiting for the first time in 2017. It appears to be a mid-season fruit in Florida ripening in July, and has a rather short season. 

ST Maui

ST Maui originated in Hawaii and was evaluated by the University of Hawaii’s research program under the name S-T (which is someone’s initials, not an abbreviation for ‘saint’). No literature exists describing it but we speculate White Piri was in its parentage. It did not receive recommendation from UH but was sent to Florida by Richard Hamilton. 


The fruit are round in shape, medium sized, developing striking red blush with green/yellow background at maturity. The flesh is firm, fiberless, and yellow, containing a monoembryonic seed. The flavor is tremendous and very unique, with a sweet and resinous spice character and detectable note of guava fruit. It probably belongs in the Indian/West Indian flavor group. It’s one of our favorite tasting mangos, and has a nice shelf life as well. 


The trees are extremely vigorous growers with spreading growth habit and dense canopy, not suitable for small yards. They have medium anthracnose tolerance, and set fruit well when they flower. They are not precocious trees though and have had only partial blooms in warm winters. Still, we feel ST Maui is a special mango and possibly a good alternative to people wanting to grow Bombay. We are evaluating it for resistance to the newer diseases and so far it is holding up well. It is a mid-season variety in Florida, maturing in July.

Super Julie

This mango was a seedling of Julie from the breeding program of Gary Zill in Boynton Beach, FL (planting # J-12) and shows great promise. Richard Campbell had originally given it the name ‘Fairchild Ruby’ but this name is confusing because there is already a Fairchild mango and a Ruby mango (see previous descriptions), so it has been re-named ‘Super Julie’. It is a small-to-medium sized fruit, oval shaped developing a beautiful ref color at maturity with light green/yellow background. The flesh is soft, fiberless, orange in color containing a monoembryonic seed. The flavor is deliciously rich and outstanding, in the Alphonso-group with abundant spice character and dessert-like sweetness. Its somewhere in between Julie and Carrie in flavor profile, yet superior to both in sweetness,with a brix in the 20s. 


The tree is a vigorous grower with spreading open canopy. It appears to possess above average anthracnose resistance and can fruit in humid areas. The production is good and steady and it looks precocious, while the fruit appear resistant to the newer diseases as well. 


We are very excited about Super Julie’s potential and have topworked a few trees into it as well. It is a mid-season mango maturing from late June through July.

Sturrock

Sturrock was selected by David Sturrock in West Palm Beach, FL in the 1960s. It was a cross between the Haden and Duncan, which Sturrock hoped would have the production of Duncan but the color of Haden. 

The fruit are oval to round in shape, turning a pale yellow color at maturity with limited pink blush. The flesh is firm, fiberless, and yellow in color, containing a monoembryonic seed. The flavor is in the classic group. 

The trees are somewhat vertical growers and moderately vigorous. They have been alternate bearers thus far due to troubles flowering in warm winters. The fruit are highly resistant to anthracnose and appear to be *highly* resistant to rot and bacterial spot as well. Sturrock is an early season mango ripening from June to July.



 

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